Transient and steady state stimulus-response relations for cat retinal ganglion cells

Ray Winters, J. W. Walters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Single unit recordings were made from cat optic tract fibers while varying the luminance and size of spots placed in the center of a cell's receptive field. Both transient and steady state stimulus-response curves could be divided into two segments: a monotonic increasing portion for low contrast levels and a non-monotonic decreasing segment for high contrast levels. Three conclusions were made: 1. (1) that the cat retinal ganglion cell gives a more precise representation of intensity changes in the low contrast range than in the high contrast range; 2. (2) that the intensity code is non-linear for the low contrast range; 3. (3) that more information about intensity changes is signalled during the transient phase than during the steady state phase of the response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-477
Number of pages17
JournalVision Research
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1970
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retinal Ganglion Cells
Cats
Optic Tract

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Transient and steady state stimulus-response relations for cat retinal ganglion cells. / Winters, Ray; Walters, J. W.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 10, No. 6, 01.01.1970, p. 461-477.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a58219f0928148a9be1a511209bafbd9,
title = "Transient and steady state stimulus-response relations for cat retinal ganglion cells",
abstract = "Single unit recordings were made from cat optic tract fibers while varying the luminance and size of spots placed in the center of a cell's receptive field. Both transient and steady state stimulus-response curves could be divided into two segments: a monotonic increasing portion for low contrast levels and a non-monotonic decreasing segment for high contrast levels. Three conclusions were made: 1. (1) that the cat retinal ganglion cell gives a more precise representation of intensity changes in the low contrast range than in the high contrast range; 2. (2) that the intensity code is non-linear for the low contrast range; 3. (3) that more information about intensity changes is signalled during the transient phase than during the steady state phase of the response.",
author = "Ray Winters and Walters, {J. W.}",
year = "1970",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0042-6989(70)90003-9",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "461--477",
journal = "Vision Research",
issn = "0042-6989",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transient and steady state stimulus-response relations for cat retinal ganglion cells

AU - Winters, Ray

AU - Walters, J. W.

PY - 1970/1/1

Y1 - 1970/1/1

N2 - Single unit recordings were made from cat optic tract fibers while varying the luminance and size of spots placed in the center of a cell's receptive field. Both transient and steady state stimulus-response curves could be divided into two segments: a monotonic increasing portion for low contrast levels and a non-monotonic decreasing segment for high contrast levels. Three conclusions were made: 1. (1) that the cat retinal ganglion cell gives a more precise representation of intensity changes in the low contrast range than in the high contrast range; 2. (2) that the intensity code is non-linear for the low contrast range; 3. (3) that more information about intensity changes is signalled during the transient phase than during the steady state phase of the response.

AB - Single unit recordings were made from cat optic tract fibers while varying the luminance and size of spots placed in the center of a cell's receptive field. Both transient and steady state stimulus-response curves could be divided into two segments: a monotonic increasing portion for low contrast levels and a non-monotonic decreasing segment for high contrast levels. Three conclusions were made: 1. (1) that the cat retinal ganglion cell gives a more precise representation of intensity changes in the low contrast range than in the high contrast range; 2. (2) that the intensity code is non-linear for the low contrast range; 3. (3) that more information about intensity changes is signalled during the transient phase than during the steady state phase of the response.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0014796808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0014796808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0042-6989(70)90003-9

DO - 10.1016/0042-6989(70)90003-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 5489232

AN - SCOPUS:0014796808

VL - 10

SP - 461

EP - 477

JO - Vision Research

JF - Vision Research

SN - 0042-6989

IS - 6

ER -