Training of residents in peripheral nerve blocks during anesthesiology residency

Jacques E. Chelly, Jennifer Greger, Ralf E Gebhard, Carin A. Hagberg, Tameem Al-Samsam, Ahmad Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To survey American anesthesiology residency program directors to determine the availability and extent of training in peripheral nerve block techniques. Design: Survey questionnaire was mailed and faxed to 132 American anesthesiology residency program directors and followed up 4 weeks later with another mailing to nonresponders. Setting: University medical center. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 132 American anesthesiology residency program directors surveyed, 69 (52%) responded. Of the responders, 40 (58%) offered a specific peripheral nerve block rotation. The rotation was of 1 month's duration in 61% of these programs. Formal instruction was administered during the rotation in 69%. The regional instruction approach consisted of a nerve stimulator (98%), paresthesia (75%), and transarterial (85%). Multimedia, mannequins, and cadaver dissection were used infrequently (13-25%). During the rotation, residents performed a variety of blocks, but the number of each block varied from 2 (supraclavicular) to 10 (axillary). These blocks were performed in the operating room in 48% of programs. Finally, in the programs with a specific peripheral nerve block rotation, residents were evaluated. Conclusions: Specific peripheral nerve block rotations are not always included in anesthesiology residents' curriculum. In addition, residents in programs with a specific nerve block rotation are exposed to a greater number of peripheral nerve block techniques than those who do not have such a rotation included in their curriculum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-588
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anesthesiology
Nerve Block
Internship and Residency
Peripheral Nerves
Curriculum
Manikins
Multimedia
Paresthesia
Operating Rooms
Cadaver
Dissection

Keywords

  • Anesthesiology education
  • Anesthesiology residency
  • Peripheral nerve blocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Training of residents in peripheral nerve blocks during anesthesiology residency. / Chelly, Jacques E.; Greger, Jennifer; Gebhard, Ralf E; Hagberg, Carin A.; Al-Samsam, Tameem; Khan, Ahmad.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.12.2002, p. 584-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chelly, Jacques E. ; Greger, Jennifer ; Gebhard, Ralf E ; Hagberg, Carin A. ; Al-Samsam, Tameem ; Khan, Ahmad. / Training of residents in peripheral nerve blocks during anesthesiology residency. In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2002 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 584-588.
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