Training Effects on Attitudes Toward Divergent Thinking Among Manufacturing Engineers

Min Basadur, George B. Graen, Teresa Scandura

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63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a field experiment, we tested the effects of training on attitudes of 112 manufacturing engineers toward divergent thinking in problem solving. The second group (n = 47) served as the control for the first group (n = 65) in the first part of the experiment, and vice versa in the second part. Measurements of attitudes toward divergent thinking were taken at three points in time (baseline, following the training of the first group, and following the training of the second group). Results showed that the training positively affected engineers' attitudes toward divergent thinking in problem solving. Specifically, the training with intact work groups demonstrated consistent results, whereas training with those from diffuse locations produced mixed results. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-617
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Training Effects on Attitudes Toward Divergent Thinking Among Manufacturing Engineers. / Basadur, Min; Graen, George B.; Scandura, Teresa.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 71, No. 4, 01.11.1986, p. 612-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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