Trade, power, and location: the spatial dynamics of the relationship between exchange and political-economic strength

G. L. Gaile, Richard Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through an empirical analysis of 40 years of international trade data, the dynamic relationships between trade and political-economic power are investigated in a spatial context on a global scale. The basic hypothesis is that location continues to play a significant role in trade relationships after differential political and economic power determinants are considered. Using a simple spatial interaction model, trade is analyzed as a predictable relationship based on distance and a broad definition of power. This classic gravity model predicts the majority of the variance in the complex structure of contemporary international trade. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-337
Number of pages9
JournalEconomic Geography
Volume65
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

economic power
political power
world trade
international trade
economics
empirical analysis
determinants
interaction
gravity
Political economics
Exchange relationships
International trade
Economic power

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Trade, power, and location : the spatial dynamics of the relationship between exchange and political-economic strength. / Gaile, G. L.; Grant, Richard.

In: Economic Geography, Vol. 65, No. 4, 1989, p. 329-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a27bf5c2c3b3490fbd5713519a464400,
title = "Trade, power, and location: the spatial dynamics of the relationship between exchange and political-economic strength",
abstract = "Through an empirical analysis of 40 years of international trade data, the dynamic relationships between trade and political-economic power are investigated in a spatial context on a global scale. The basic hypothesis is that location continues to play a significant role in trade relationships after differential political and economic power determinants are considered. Using a simple spatial interaction model, trade is analyzed as a predictable relationship based on distance and a broad definition of power. This classic gravity model predicts the majority of the variance in the complex structure of contemporary international trade. -from Authors",
author = "Gaile, {G. L.} and Richard Grant",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "329--337",
journal = "Economic Geography",
issn = "0013-0095",
publisher = "Clark University",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trade, power, and location

T2 - the spatial dynamics of the relationship between exchange and political-economic strength

AU - Gaile, G. L.

AU - Grant, Richard

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - Through an empirical analysis of 40 years of international trade data, the dynamic relationships between trade and political-economic power are investigated in a spatial context on a global scale. The basic hypothesis is that location continues to play a significant role in trade relationships after differential political and economic power determinants are considered. Using a simple spatial interaction model, trade is analyzed as a predictable relationship based on distance and a broad definition of power. This classic gravity model predicts the majority of the variance in the complex structure of contemporary international trade. -from Authors

AB - Through an empirical analysis of 40 years of international trade data, the dynamic relationships between trade and political-economic power are investigated in a spatial context on a global scale. The basic hypothesis is that location continues to play a significant role in trade relationships after differential political and economic power determinants are considered. Using a simple spatial interaction model, trade is analyzed as a predictable relationship based on distance and a broad definition of power. This classic gravity model predicts the majority of the variance in the complex structure of contemporary international trade. -from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024784046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024784046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0024784046

VL - 65

SP - 329

EP - 337

JO - Economic Geography

JF - Economic Geography

SN - 0013-0095

IS - 4

ER -