Toward an empirical subclassification of "learning disabilitiesℍ: A psychophysiological comparison of "hyperactiveℍ and "nonhyperactiveℍ subgroups

Alan M Delamater, Benjamin B. Lahey, Linda Drake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The diagnostic category of learning disabilities is a heterogeneous one, but few empirical attempts have been made to distinguish subgroups. Recent research, however, suggests that it may be meaningful to discriminate between "hyperactiveℍ and "nonhyperactiveℍ learning-disabled children. In the present study, 21 learning-disabled children identified as "hyperactiveℍ through teacher nominations and ratings were compared to 15 learning-disabled children identified as "nonhyperactiveℍ in the same manner. The two groups differed on rated behavior, birth order, amount of prescribed stimulant medication, amount of psychosocial stress, and Verbal, Performance, and Full Scale WISC-R IQ scores. They did not differ, however, on several demographic variables, the number of perinatal complications, reading achievement, and a number of tonic and phasic measures of autonomie activity. These findings support the distinction between "hyperactiveℍ and "nonhyperactiveℍ subgroups of learning-disabled children, but suggest that the two subgroups may have a similar biological substrate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-77
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Learning Disorders
Disabled Children
Learning
Birth Order
Reading
Demography
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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