Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer

G. M. Senofsky, Frederick L Moffat, K. Davis, M. M. Masri, K. C. Clark, D. S. Robinson, B. Sabates, A. S. Ketcham

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Abstract

The optimal extent of axillary dissection in patients with breast cancer remains unclear. We report 278 total axillary lymphadenectomies (levels I, II, and III and Rotter's [interpectoral] nodes) that were performed in 264 closely followed up private patients. There have been no axillary recurrences to date (mean follow-up, 50 months). If only level I and II nodes had been removed, the false-negative staging error would have been only 2.6%. However, 29 (31.5%) of 92 pathological node-positive axillae contained apical and/or Rotter's metastases. The incidence of complications was comparable with that reported for partial lymphadenectomy. Arm lymphedema developed in 6% of nonirradiated patients; postoperative radiotherapy and gross nodal disease were significant risk factors for lymphedema. Total axillary lymphadenectomy largely prevents axillary recurrence, eliminates the small staging error inherent in partial lymphadenectomy, and has acceptable morbidity, provided radiotherapy to the regional nodal areas is avoided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1336-1342
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume126
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Lymph Node Excision
Breast Neoplasms
Lymphedema
Radiotherapy
Recurrence
Axilla
Dissection
Arm
Neoplasm Metastasis
Morbidity
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Senofsky, G. M., Moffat, F. L., Davis, K., Masri, M. M., Clark, K. C., Robinson, D. S., ... Ketcham, A. S. (1991). Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer. Archives of Surgery, 126(11), 1336-1342.

Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer. / Senofsky, G. M.; Moffat, Frederick L; Davis, K.; Masri, M. M.; Clark, K. C.; Robinson, D. S.; Sabates, B.; Ketcham, A. S.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 126, No. 11, 01.01.1991, p. 1336-1342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Senofsky, GM, Moffat, FL, Davis, K, Masri, MM, Clark, KC, Robinson, DS, Sabates, B & Ketcham, AS 1991, 'Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer', Archives of Surgery, vol. 126, no. 11, pp. 1336-1342.
Senofsky GM, Moffat FL, Davis K, Masri MM, Clark KC, Robinson DS et al. Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer. Archives of Surgery. 1991 Jan 1;126(11):1336-1342.
Senofsky, G. M. ; Moffat, Frederick L ; Davis, K. ; Masri, M. M. ; Clark, K. C. ; Robinson, D. S. ; Sabates, B. ; Ketcham, A. S. / Total axillary lymphadenectomy in the management of breast cancer. In: Archives of Surgery. 1991 ; Vol. 126, No. 11. pp. 1336-1342.
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