Topical therapy for osteoarthritis: Clinical and pharmacologic perspectives

Roy D Altman, Robert L. Barkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have shown efficacy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) pain but are also associated with a dose-dependent risk of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematologic, hepatic, and renal adverse events (AEs). Topical NSAIDs were developed to provide analgesia similar to their oral counterparts with less systemic exposure and fewer serious AEs. Topical NSAIDs have long been available in Europe for the management of OA, and guidelines of the European League Against Rheumatism and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International specify that topical NSAIDs are preferred over oral NSAIDs for patients with knee or hand OA of mild-to-moderate severity, few affected joints, and/or a history of sensitivity to oral NSAIDs. In contrast, the guidelines of the American Pain Society and American College of Rheumatology have in the past recommended topical methyl salicylate and topical capsaicin, but not topical NSAIDs. This reflects the fact that the American guidelines were written several years before the first topical NSAID was approved for use in the United States. Neither salicylates nor capsaicin have shown significant efficacy in the treatment of OA. In October 2007, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (Voltaren® Gel) became the first topical NSAID for OA therapy approved in the United States following a long history of use internationally. Topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel delivers effective diclofenac concentrations in the affected joint with limited systemic exposure. Clinical trial data suggest that diclofenac sodium 1% gel provides clinically meaningful analgesia in OA patients with a low incidence of systemic AEs. This review discusses the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety profiles of diclofenac sodium 1% gel, salicylates, and capsaicin for the management of hand and knee OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-147
Number of pages9
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume121
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteoarthritis
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Diclofenac
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gels
Capsaicin
Therapeutics
Salicylates
Guidelines
Analgesia
Hand
Joints
Knee Osteoarthritis
Knee
Clinical Trials
Pharmacology
Kidney
Safety
Drug Therapy
Pain

Keywords

  • Diclofenac
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Topical analgesics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Topical therapy for osteoarthritis : Clinical and pharmacologic perspectives. / Altman, Roy D; Barkin, Robert L.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 121, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 139-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Altman, Roy D ; Barkin, Robert L. / Topical therapy for osteoarthritis : Clinical and pharmacologic perspectives. In: Postgraduate Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 121, No. 2. pp. 139-147.
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