Top 10 research questions related to exercise deficit disorder (EDD) in youth

Avery D. Faigenbaum, Thomas M. Best, James MacDonald, Gregory D. Myer, Andrea Stracciolini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exercise deficit disorder (EDD) is a pediatric medical condition characterized by reduced levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) that are below current recommendations and inconsistent with positive health outcomes. At present, a majority of children and adolescents meet the diagnostic criteria for EDD because they are not accumulating minimum thresholds of daily MVPA. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 important research questions related to EDD in youth. The critical research needs to better define the clinical spectrum of EDD to include an assessment of physical activity behaviors to determine the age or stage of maturation at which EDD first emerges; an examination of the kinesiogenesis of movement skills and physical abilities; and an evaluation of lifestyle factors that can influence the MVPA trajectory in youth. Research questions about interventions and policies to treat EDD include evaluating the education and training of health care providers on the importance of exercise medicine; determining the effectiveness of strategies to identify and treat youth with EDD in clinical practice; developing sensitive, specific, and cost-effective methods to diagnose youth with EDD; and assessing methods to promote health care reimbursement for the treatment of this condition. Without future research to optimize identification, treatment, and management strategies for youth with EDD, new health care concerns with significant biomedical, psychosocial, economic, and political ramifications will continue to emerge. © 2014

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-307
Number of pages11
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • pediatric exercise
  • physical activity
  • public health
  • reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nephrology

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