Today's approach to PTCA: how it is performed, who might benefit. When can angioplasty replace medical therapy or bypass surgery?

M. Moscucci, T. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has expanded tremendously over the past decade. Because equipment has improved and physicians' experience has increased, the procedure is often appropriate for patients with complex lesions or difficult coronary anatomies. Currently, stenoses are successfully opened in more than 90% of patients. Angioplasty is an alternative to medical therapy for patients with one- or two-vessel disease; in some patients with multivessel disease, it is an alternative to coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Among elderly patients, those who are poor candidates for bypass surgery, those who have had previous bypass surgery, and those with acute myocardial infarction or cardiogenic shock, coronary angioplasty may be particularly useful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-188; 191
JournalThe Journal of critical illness
Volume8
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1993

Fingerprint

Angioplasty
Therapeutics
Coronary Balloon Angioplasty
Cardiogenic Shock
Coronary Artery Bypass
Anatomy
Pathologic Constriction
Myocardial Infarction
Physicians
Transplants
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Today's approach to PTCA : how it is performed, who might benefit. When can angioplasty replace medical therapy or bypass surgery? / Moscucci, M.; Feldman, T.

In: The Journal of critical illness, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.02.1993, p. 185-188; 191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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