Tissue engineering of artificial organs

Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue engineering efforts are currently being undertaken for every type of tissue and organ within the urinary system. Most of the effort expended to engineer genitourinary tissues has occurred within the last decade. Tissue engineering techniques require expertise in growth factor biology, a cell culture facility designed for human application, and personnel who have mastered the techniques of cell harvest, culture, and expansion. Polymer scaffold design and manufacturing resources are essential for the successful application of this technology. In order to apply these engineering techniques to humans, further studies need to be performed with many of the tissues described. The first human application of cell-based tissue engineering technology for urologic applications took place at our institution, with the injection of autologous cells for the correction of vesicoureteral reflux in children. The same technology has been expanded to treat adult patients with urinary incontinence. Trials of urethral tissue replacement with processed collagen matrices are in progress, and bladder replacement using tissue engineering techniques are currently being arranged. Recent progress suggests that engineered urologic tissues may have clinical applicability in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Artificial Organs
Tissue Engineering
Technology
Cell Culture Techniques
Vesico-Ureteral Reflux
Urinary Incontinence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Polymers
Urinary Bladder
Collagen
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Tissue engineering of artificial organs. / Atala, Anthony.

In: Journal of Endourology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.02.2000, p. 49-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Atala, A 2000, 'Tissue engineering of artificial organs', Journal of Endourology, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 49-57.
Atala, Anthony. / Tissue engineering of artificial organs. In: Journal of Endourology. 2000 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 49-57.
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