Tissue Accumulation and the Effects of Long-Term Dietary Copper Contamination on Osmoregulation in the Mudflat Fiddler Crab Minuca rapax (Crustacea, Ocypodidae)

M. V. Capparelli, J. C. McNamara, M. G. Grosell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined copper accumulation in the hemolymph, gills and hepatopancreas, and hemolymph osmolality, Na+ and Cl concentrations, together with gill Na+/K+-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase activities, after dietary copper delivery (0, 100 or 500 Cu µg g−1) for 12 days in a fiddler crab, Minuca rapax. In contaminated crabs, copper concentration decreased in the hemolymph and hepatopancreas, but increased in the gills. Hemolymph osmolality and gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased while hemolymph [Na+] and [Cl] and gill carbonic anhydrase activity decreased. Excretion likely accounts for the decreased hemolymph and hepatopancreas copper titers. Dietary copper clearly affected osmoregulatory ability and hemolymph Na+ and Cl regulation in M. rapax. Gill copper accumulation decreased carbonic anhydrase activity, suggesting that dietary copper affects acid–base balance. Elevated gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity appears to compensate for the ion-regulatory disturbance. These effects of dietary copper illustrate likely impacts on semi-terrestrial species that feed on metal-contaminated sediments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-762
Number of pages8
JournalBulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Volume104
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Dietary copper contamination
  • Fiddler crab
  • Gill enzymes
  • Osmotic and ionic regulation
  • Tissue copper accumulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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