Time requirements for intraoperative neurosonography

Robert Quencer, B. M. Montalvo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time requirements needed for radiologists to perform intraoperative neurosonography were analyzed. Eighty-five consecutive intracranial and spinal operative procedures were prospectively monitored, and it was found that (1) the average length of time spent in the operating room by the radiologist was 1 hr in spinal cases and 52 min in intracranial cases; (2) the wide range of time spent in each case depended on the complexities of the operation; (3) only one-fifth of the radiologist's time in the operating room was spent performing the study and interpreting the sonograms; and (4) 24% of cases were either emergencies or were performed after normal working hours. It may be helpful to take these factors into consideration when there are plans to offer the service of intraoperative neurosonography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-818
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume146
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Operating Rooms
Operative Surgical Procedures
Emergencies
Radiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Time requirements for intraoperative neurosonography. / Quencer, Robert; Montalvo, B. M.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 146, No. 4, 01.01.1986, p. 815-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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