Tiagabine in clinical practice: Effects on seizure control and behavior

David G. Vossler, George L. Morris, Cynthia L. Harden, Georgia Montouris, Edward Faught, Andres M Kanner, Aaron Fix, Jacqueline A. French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Preapproval randomized controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs provide data in limited patient groups. We assessed the side effect and seizure reduction profile of tiagabine (TGB) in typical clinical practice. Methods: Investigators recorded adverse effect (AE), seizure, and assessment-of-benefit data prospectively in sequential patients treated open label with TGB. Results: Two hundred ninety-two patients (39 children) were enrolled to be treated long term with TGB. Seizure types were focal-onset (86%), generalized-onset (12%), both focal- and generalized-onset (0.3%), and multiple associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (2%). Two hundred thirty-one received at least one dose of TGB (median = 28. mg/day) and had follow-up seizure or AE data reported. Common AEs were fatigue, dizziness, psychomotor slowing, ataxia, gastrointestinal upset, weight change, insomnia, and "others" (mostly behavioral). Serious AEs occurred in 19 patients: behavioral effects (n= 12), status epilepticus (n= 3), others (n = 3), and sudden unexplained death (n= 1). No patients experienced suicidal ideation/behavior, rash, nephrolithiasis, or organ failure. Seizure outcomes were seizure freedom (5%), ≥. 75% reduction (12%), ≥. 50% reduction (23%), and increased number of seizures (17%), or new seizure type (1%). Conclusions: Behavioral AEs occurred in a larger proportion of patients compared to those reported in TGB preapproval randomized controlled trials. A moderate percentage of patients had a meaningful reduction in seizure frequency. In clinical practice, TGB remains a useful antiepileptic drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-216
Number of pages6
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Behavior Control
Seizures
Anticonvulsants
Randomized Controlled Trials
tiagabine
Nephrolithiasis
Suicidal Ideation
Status Epilepticus
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Dizziness
Ataxia
Sudden Death
Exanthema
Fatigue
Research Personnel
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Adverse event
  • Behavior
  • Children
  • Efficacy
  • Human
  • Long-term
  • Open-label
  • Tiagabine
  • Trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vossler, D. G., Morris, G. L., Harden, C. L., Montouris, G., Faught, E., Kanner, A. M., ... French, J. A. (2013). Tiagabine in clinical practice: Effects on seizure control and behavior. Epilepsy and Behavior, 28(2), 211-216. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.05.006

Tiagabine in clinical practice : Effects on seizure control and behavior. / Vossler, David G.; Morris, George L.; Harden, Cynthia L.; Montouris, Georgia; Faught, Edward; Kanner, Andres M; Fix, Aaron; French, Jacqueline A.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2013, p. 211-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vossler, DG, Morris, GL, Harden, CL, Montouris, G, Faught, E, Kanner, AM, Fix, A & French, JA 2013, 'Tiagabine in clinical practice: Effects on seizure control and behavior', Epilepsy and Behavior, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 211-216. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.05.006
Vossler, David G. ; Morris, George L. ; Harden, Cynthia L. ; Montouris, Georgia ; Faught, Edward ; Kanner, Andres M ; Fix, Aaron ; French, Jacqueline A. / Tiagabine in clinical practice : Effects on seizure control and behavior. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 211-216.
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