Thirty-day readmissions following parathyroidectomy: Evidence from the National Readmissions Database, 2013-2014

Adam M. Kravietz, Jessica L. Buicko, Joshua P. Parreco, Michael A. Lopez, Robert Kozol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Parathyroidectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, and are increasingly being performed safely in the outpatient setting. However, complications from surgery can be life-threatening, and thus an understanding of who may be at risk is essential. We analyzed and compared the risk factors for patients readmitted within 30 days following inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and methods: We reviewed the National Readmissions Database from 2013 to 2014 for patients who received inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. The primary outcome was non-elective readmission within 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze risk factor odds ratios for readmission. Results: 7171 patients underwent inpatient parathyroidectomies in 2013 and 2014. 59.89% of parathyroidectomies were performed for primary hyperparathyroidism, with a 5.6% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were septicemia (13.69%), hypocalcemia (12.86%), heart failure (10.79%) and renal failure (9.54%). Having Medicare (OR: 1.71, CI:1.14-2.59, p = .01), Medicaid (OR: 3.24, CI: 2.03-5.17, p < .001), and self-paying (OR: 2.43, CI: 1.11-5.32, p = .02), were associated with increased odds of readmission for those with primary hyperparathyroidism. 21.99% of parathyroidectomies were performed for secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a 19.4% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were hypocalcemia (22.88%), hungry bone syndrome (14.38%), electrolyte disorders (13.73%), and renal failure (11.11%). Conclusion: Patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism are older, poorer and have more comorbidities than patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and are more likely to be readmitted within 30 days of parathyroidectomy.

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Parathyroidectomy
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Databases
Secondary Hyperparathyroidism
Inpatients
Hypocalcemia
Renal Insufficiency
Medicaid
Medicare
Electrolytes
Comorbidity
Sepsis
Outpatients
Heart Failure
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Thirty-day readmissions following parathyroidectomy : Evidence from the National Readmissions Database, 2013-2014. / Kravietz, Adam M.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Parreco, Joshua P.; Lopez, Michael A.; Kozol, Robert.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Thirty-day readmissions following parathyroidectomy: Evidence from the National Readmissions Database, 2013-2014",
abstract = "Purpose: Parathyroidectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, and are increasingly being performed safely in the outpatient setting. However, complications from surgery can be life-threatening, and thus an understanding of who may be at risk is essential. We analyzed and compared the risk factors for patients readmitted within 30 days following inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and methods: We reviewed the National Readmissions Database from 2013 to 2014 for patients who received inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. The primary outcome was non-elective readmission within 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze risk factor odds ratios for readmission. Results: 7171 patients underwent inpatient parathyroidectomies in 2013 and 2014. 59.89{\%} of parathyroidectomies were performed for primary hyperparathyroidism, with a 5.6{\%} readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were septicemia (13.69{\%}), hypocalcemia (12.86{\%}), heart failure (10.79{\%}) and renal failure (9.54{\%}). Having Medicare (OR: 1.71, CI:1.14-2.59, p = .01), Medicaid (OR: 3.24, CI: 2.03-5.17, p < .001), and self-paying (OR: 2.43, CI: 1.11-5.32, p = .02), were associated with increased odds of readmission for those with primary hyperparathyroidism. 21.99{\%} of parathyroidectomies were performed for secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a 19.4{\%} readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were hypocalcemia (22.88{\%}), hungry bone syndrome (14.38{\%}), electrolyte disorders (13.73{\%}), and renal failure (11.11{\%}). Conclusion: Patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism are older, poorer and have more comorbidities than patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and are more likely to be readmitted within 30 days of parathyroidectomy.",
author = "Kravietz, {Adam M.} and Buicko, {Jessica L.} and Parreco, {Joshua P.} and Lopez, {Michael A.} and Robert Kozol",
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T2 - Evidence from the National Readmissions Database, 2013-2014

AU - Kravietz, Adam M.

AU - Buicko, Jessica L.

AU - Parreco, Joshua P.

AU - Lopez, Michael A.

AU - Kozol, Robert

PY - 2018/1/1

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N2 - Purpose: Parathyroidectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, and are increasingly being performed safely in the outpatient setting. However, complications from surgery can be life-threatening, and thus an understanding of who may be at risk is essential. We analyzed and compared the risk factors for patients readmitted within 30 days following inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and methods: We reviewed the National Readmissions Database from 2013 to 2014 for patients who received inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. The primary outcome was non-elective readmission within 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze risk factor odds ratios for readmission. Results: 7171 patients underwent inpatient parathyroidectomies in 2013 and 2014. 59.89% of parathyroidectomies were performed for primary hyperparathyroidism, with a 5.6% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were septicemia (13.69%), hypocalcemia (12.86%), heart failure (10.79%) and renal failure (9.54%). Having Medicare (OR: 1.71, CI:1.14-2.59, p = .01), Medicaid (OR: 3.24, CI: 2.03-5.17, p < .001), and self-paying (OR: 2.43, CI: 1.11-5.32, p = .02), were associated with increased odds of readmission for those with primary hyperparathyroidism. 21.99% of parathyroidectomies were performed for secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a 19.4% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were hypocalcemia (22.88%), hungry bone syndrome (14.38%), electrolyte disorders (13.73%), and renal failure (11.11%). Conclusion: Patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism are older, poorer and have more comorbidities than patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and are more likely to be readmitted within 30 days of parathyroidectomy.

AB - Purpose: Parathyroidectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, and are increasingly being performed safely in the outpatient setting. However, complications from surgery can be life-threatening, and thus an understanding of who may be at risk is essential. We analyzed and compared the risk factors for patients readmitted within 30 days following inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and methods: We reviewed the National Readmissions Database from 2013 to 2014 for patients who received inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. The primary outcome was non-elective readmission within 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze risk factor odds ratios for readmission. Results: 7171 patients underwent inpatient parathyroidectomies in 2013 and 2014. 59.89% of parathyroidectomies were performed for primary hyperparathyroidism, with a 5.6% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were septicemia (13.69%), hypocalcemia (12.86%), heart failure (10.79%) and renal failure (9.54%). Having Medicare (OR: 1.71, CI:1.14-2.59, p = .01), Medicaid (OR: 3.24, CI: 2.03-5.17, p < .001), and self-paying (OR: 2.43, CI: 1.11-5.32, p = .02), were associated with increased odds of readmission for those with primary hyperparathyroidism. 21.99% of parathyroidectomies were performed for secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a 19.4% readmission rate. Most common causes of readmission were hypocalcemia (22.88%), hungry bone syndrome (14.38%), electrolyte disorders (13.73%), and renal failure (11.11%). Conclusion: Patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism are older, poorer and have more comorbidities than patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and are more likely to be readmitted within 30 days of parathyroidectomy.

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