Thinking Differently in Global Health in Oncology Using a Diagonal Approach: Harnessing Similarities, Improving Education, and Empowering an Alternative Oncology Workforce

Natalia M. Rodriguez, Jeannine M. Brant, Dinesh Pendharkar, Hector Arreola-Ornelas, Afsan Bhadelia, Gilberto de Lima Lopes, Felicia Knaul

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer is a leading global cause of death, and diverse and minority populations suffer worse outcomes compared with white people from Western societies. Within the United States, African Americans and other blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians have lower cancer survival rates than whites. In the rest of the world, those from low- and middle-income countries have the greatest disparities, but even those from non-Western high-income countries such as Oman and the United Arab Emirates are diagnosed with cancer at later stages and suffer increased mortality. Although considerable differences exist among these populations, similarities and synergies are also apparent. Challenges can be very similar in reaching these populations effectively for cancer control to improve outcomes, and innovative strategies are needed to effectively make change. In this review, the authors discuss new approaches to the prevention and early detection of cancer as well as the implementation of programs in global oncology and put in evidence cultural similarities and challenges of different populations, highlighting strategies to improve cancer survival and quality care around the world through innovations in training and education, empowerment of an alternative workforce, and a diagonal approach to cancer care using case studies drawn from the authors' work and experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-425
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology educational book. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Annual Meeting
Volume37
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Education
Neoplasms
Population
United Arab Emirates
Oman
Asian Americans
North American Indians
Quality of Health Care
Early Detection of Cancer
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Global Health
Thinking
Cause of Death
Survival Rate
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Thinking Differently in Global Health in Oncology Using a Diagonal Approach : Harnessing Similarities, Improving Education, and Empowering an Alternative Oncology Workforce. / Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Brant, Jeannine M.; Pendharkar, Dinesh; Arreola-Ornelas, Hector; Bhadelia, Afsan; de Lima Lopes, Gilberto; Knaul, Felicia.

In: American Society of Clinical Oncology educational book. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Annual Meeting, Vol. 37, 01.01.2017, p. 416-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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