Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b

A. M. Di Bisceglie, Paul Martin, M. Lisker-Melman, C. Kassianides, J. Korenman, N. V. Bergasa, B. Baker, J. H. Hoofnagle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this pilot study, 12 patients with chronic delta hepatitis were studied. The diagnosis was based on the presence of antibodies to the hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and liver. All patients were also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The infection was presumed to have been transmitted by intravenous drug abuse in six of the patients, blood transfusion in one and by sexual contact in four (two had antibodies to human immunodeficiency vims in their serum, but did not show signs of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). In one further patient, the source of infection was unknown. Interferon alfa-2b (INTRON A, Schering-Plough Corporation) was initiated at S million units per day subcutaneously for at least 4 months, being reduced by half if side effects occurred. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels, hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen were measured at monthly intervals for up to 12 months in some patients. Interferon therapy resulted in decreased serum levels of these three markers. On cessation of therapy, most patients experienced a relapse over 6 months, but alanine aminotransferase levels could be normalized once more by restarting interferon therapy. In conclusion, interferon decreased hepatic inflammation by the inhibition of hepatitis delta virus replication, although relapse occurred when interferon was stopped and long-term therapy is required to achieve permanent control of the disease. Care will be required when treating patients with advanced or decompensated liver disease.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hepatology
Volume11
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

interferon alfa-2b
Chronic Hepatitis D
Hepatitis delta Antigens
Hepatitis Delta Virus
Interferons
Hepatitis D
Serum
Alanine Transaminase
Therapeutics
Intravenous Substance Abuse
RNA
Recurrence
Antibodies
Liver
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Virus Replication
Infection
Blood Transfusion
Liver Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Di Bisceglie, A. M., Martin, P., Lisker-Melman, M., Kassianides, C., Korenman, J., Bergasa, N. V., ... Hoofnagle, J. H. (1990). Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b. Journal of Hepatology, 11(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T

Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b. / Di Bisceglie, A. M.; Martin, Paul; Lisker-Melman, M.; Kassianides, C.; Korenman, J.; Bergasa, N. V.; Baker, B.; Hoofnagle, J. H.

In: Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 11, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.01.1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Di Bisceglie, AM, Martin, P, Lisker-Melman, M, Kassianides, C, Korenman, J, Bergasa, NV, Baker, B & Hoofnagle, JH 1990, 'Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b', Journal of Hepatology, vol. 11, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T
Di Bisceglie AM, Martin P, Lisker-Melman M, Kassianides C, Korenman J, Bergasa NV et al. Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b. Journal of Hepatology. 1990 Jan 1;11(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T
Di Bisceglie, A. M. ; Martin, Paul ; Lisker-Melman, M. ; Kassianides, C. ; Korenman, J. ; Bergasa, N. V. ; Baker, B. ; Hoofnagle, J. H. / Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b. In: Journal of Hepatology. 1990 ; Vol. 11, No. SUPPL. 1.
@article{9557546575af460aa24fe5c6e4a67135,
title = "Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b",
abstract = "In this pilot study, 12 patients with chronic delta hepatitis were studied. The diagnosis was based on the presence of antibodies to the hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and liver. All patients were also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The infection was presumed to have been transmitted by intravenous drug abuse in six of the patients, blood transfusion in one and by sexual contact in four (two had antibodies to human immunodeficiency vims in their serum, but did not show signs of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). In one further patient, the source of infection was unknown. Interferon alfa-2b (INTRON A, Schering-Plough Corporation) was initiated at S million units per day subcutaneously for at least 4 months, being reduced by half if side effects occurred. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels, hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen were measured at monthly intervals for up to 12 months in some patients. Interferon therapy resulted in decreased serum levels of these three markers. On cessation of therapy, most patients experienced a relapse over 6 months, but alanine aminotransferase levels could be normalized once more by restarting interferon therapy. In conclusion, interferon decreased hepatic inflammation by the inhibition of hepatitis delta virus replication, although relapse occurred when interferon was stopped and long-term therapy is required to achieve permanent control of the disease. Care will be required when treating patients with advanced or decompensated liver disease.",
author = "{Di Bisceglie}, {A. M.} and Paul Martin and M. Lisker-Melman and C. Kassianides and J. Korenman and Bergasa, {N. V.} and B. Baker and Hoofnagle, {J. H.}",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Journal of Hepatology",
issn = "0168-8278",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Therapy of chronic delta hepatitis with interferon alfa-2b

AU - Di Bisceglie, A. M.

AU - Martin, Paul

AU - Lisker-Melman, M.

AU - Kassianides, C.

AU - Korenman, J.

AU - Bergasa, N. V.

AU - Baker, B.

AU - Hoofnagle, J. H.

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - In this pilot study, 12 patients with chronic delta hepatitis were studied. The diagnosis was based on the presence of antibodies to the hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and liver. All patients were also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The infection was presumed to have been transmitted by intravenous drug abuse in six of the patients, blood transfusion in one and by sexual contact in four (two had antibodies to human immunodeficiency vims in their serum, but did not show signs of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). In one further patient, the source of infection was unknown. Interferon alfa-2b (INTRON A, Schering-Plough Corporation) was initiated at S million units per day subcutaneously for at least 4 months, being reduced by half if side effects occurred. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels, hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen were measured at monthly intervals for up to 12 months in some patients. Interferon therapy resulted in decreased serum levels of these three markers. On cessation of therapy, most patients experienced a relapse over 6 months, but alanine aminotransferase levels could be normalized once more by restarting interferon therapy. In conclusion, interferon decreased hepatic inflammation by the inhibition of hepatitis delta virus replication, although relapse occurred when interferon was stopped and long-term therapy is required to achieve permanent control of the disease. Care will be required when treating patients with advanced or decompensated liver disease.

AB - In this pilot study, 12 patients with chronic delta hepatitis were studied. The diagnosis was based on the presence of antibodies to the hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen in the serum and liver. All patients were also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The infection was presumed to have been transmitted by intravenous drug abuse in six of the patients, blood transfusion in one and by sexual contact in four (two had antibodies to human immunodeficiency vims in their serum, but did not show signs of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). In one further patient, the source of infection was unknown. Interferon alfa-2b (INTRON A, Schering-Plough Corporation) was initiated at S million units per day subcutaneously for at least 4 months, being reduced by half if side effects occurred. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels, hepatitis delta virus RNA and hepatitis delta antigen were measured at monthly intervals for up to 12 months in some patients. Interferon therapy resulted in decreased serum levels of these three markers. On cessation of therapy, most patients experienced a relapse over 6 months, but alanine aminotransferase levels could be normalized once more by restarting interferon therapy. In conclusion, interferon decreased hepatic inflammation by the inhibition of hepatitis delta virus replication, although relapse occurred when interferon was stopped and long-term therapy is required to achieve permanent control of the disease. Care will be required when treating patients with advanced or decompensated liver disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025691427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025691427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T

DO - 10.1016/0168-8278(90)90185-T

M3 - Article

C2 - 2079575

AN - SCOPUS:0025691427

VL - 11

JO - Journal of Hepatology

JF - Journal of Hepatology

SN - 0168-8278

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -