Therapies for hepatitis B virus

Current status and future possibilities

Paul Martin, L. S. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On a world-wide basis the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most significant viral pathogen affecting man; several hundred million people are infected. Although the chief burden of illness is felt in certain areas such as the Far East and sub-Saharan Africa, HBV is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (1). Estimates by the Centers for Disease Control suggest that there are more than three hundred thousand new cases of acute hepatitis B in the United States every year, with four thousand deaths due to cirrhosis and one thousand deaths due to hepatocellular carcinoma annually (2). Approximately 0.5% of the United States population is chronically infected with HBV, in contrast to 20% of the population in endemic areas such as the Far East and sub-Saharan Africa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-120
Number of pages10
JournalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume312
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Viruses
Hepatitis B virus
Far East
Africa South of the Sahara
Disease control
Cost of Illness
Pathogens
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Hepatitis B
Population
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Therapies for hepatitis B virus : Current status and future possibilities. / Martin, Paul; Friedman, L. S.

In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, Vol. 312, 01.01.1992, p. 111-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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