Theory-based approach for maintaining resistance training in older adults with prediabetes: adherence, barriers, self-regulation strategies, treatment fidelity, costs

Richard A. Winett, Brenda M. Davy, Jyoti Savla, Elaina L. Marinik, Sarah A. Kelleher, Sheila G. Winett, Tanya M. Halliday, David M. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effectively preventing and treating chronic diseases through health behavior changes often require intensive theory- and evidence-based intervention including long-term maintenance components. We assessed the efficacy of theory-based maintenance approaches varying by dose for persistently performing resistance training (RT) with the hypothesis that a higher-dose social cognitive theory (SCT) approach would produce greater RT adherence than lower-dose Standard. The Resist-Diabetes study first established 2×/week resistance training (RT) in a 3-month supervised intervention in older (50–69 years, N = 170), overweight to obese (BMI 25–39.9 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) previously inactive adults who fit prediabetes criteria (fasting glucose concentration = 95–125 mg/dl; oral glucose tolerance test 2-h glucose concentration = 140–199 mg/dl or both). After the supervised phase, participants (N = 159) were then randomly assigned to one of two conditions for transition (3 weeks) and then RT alone in community settings for extended contact, maintenance (6 months), and then no contact (6 months). SCT featured continued tailored, interactive personal, and web-based check-ups focused on RT, self-regulation, and a barrier/strategies approach. Standard involved low-dose, generic personal, and web-based check-ups within the same theoretical approach. SCT and Standard both resulted in similar RT, 2×/week adherence during maintenance (74.4 %) and no-contact phases (53.1 %). Cost analysis indicated the Standard intervention for transition and maintenance was inexpensive ($160). Standard can be translated into practice with the potential for continuous contact and persistence in RT beyond the typical program maintenance phase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-159
Number of pages11
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prediabetic State
Resistance Training
Health Care Costs
Maintenance
Glucose
Health Behavior
Glucose Tolerance Test
Self-Control
Fasting
Chronic Disease
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Behavioral maintenance
  • Cost
  • Diabetes
  • Health behavior change
  • Resistance training
  • Social cognitive theory
  • Treatment fidelity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Theory-based approach for maintaining resistance training in older adults with prediabetes : adherence, barriers, self-regulation strategies, treatment fidelity, costs. / Winett, Richard A.; Davy, Brenda M.; Savla, Jyoti; Marinik, Elaina L.; Kelleher, Sarah A.; Winett, Sheila G.; Halliday, Tanya M.; Williams, David M.

In: Translational Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 2, 29.06.2015, p. 149-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winett, Richard A. ; Davy, Brenda M. ; Savla, Jyoti ; Marinik, Elaina L. ; Kelleher, Sarah A. ; Winett, Sheila G. ; Halliday, Tanya M. ; Williams, David M. / Theory-based approach for maintaining resistance training in older adults with prediabetes : adherence, barriers, self-regulation strategies, treatment fidelity, costs. In: Translational Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 149-159.
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