The value of using measurements of geomagnetic field in addition to irradiance and sea surface temperature to estimate geolocations of tagged aquatic animals

A. Peter Klimley, Marco Flagg, Neil Hammerschlag, Alex Hearn

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this commentary, we describe how geomagnetic intensity can be used to estimate latitude, discuss its strengths and weaknesses, and argue for its potential use along with irradiance measurements for estimating the latitude of a migratory fish carrying an archival tag. We conclude this commentary by suggesting that researchers and tag manufacturers estimate positions using as many inputs as possible, environmental irradiance, sea surface temperature, and geomagnetic field. Each environmental property will provide a better estimate of position at different times of the year and locations on earth. We contend that one geolocation estimation approach is not better than another, as each functions optimally under different circumstances and thus should be used accordingly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number19
JournalAnimal Biotelemetry
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2017

Keywords

  • Archival tags
  • Geolocation
  • Geomagnetic intensity
  • Irradiance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Signal Processing
  • Instrumentation

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