The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid

Pedro M. Baptista, Mohummad M. Siddiqui, Genevieve Lozier, Sergio R. Rodriguez, Anthony Atala, Shay Soker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

389 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major roadblock to successful organ bioengineering is the need for a functional vascular network within the engineered tissue. Here, we describe the fabrication of three-dimensional, naturally derived scaffolds with an intact vascular tree. Livers from different species were perfused with detergent to selectively remove the cellular components of the tissue while preserving the extracellular matrix components and the intact vascular network. The decellularized vascular network was able to withstand fluid flow that entered through a central inlet vessel, branched into an extensive capillary bed, and coalesced into a single outlet vessel. The vascular network was used to reseed the scaffolds with human fetal liver and endothelial cells. These cells engrafted in their putative native locations within the decellularized organ and displayed typical endothelial, hepatic, and biliary epithelial markers, thus creating a liver-like tissue in vitro. Conclusion: These results represent a significant advancement in the bioengineering of whole organs. This technology may provide the necessary tools to produce the first fully functional bioengineered livers for organ transplantation and drug discovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)604-617
Number of pages14
JournalHepatology
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Organoids
Blood Vessels
Liver
Bioengineering
Organ Transplantation
Drug Discovery
Detergents
Liver Transplantation
Extracellular Matrix
Endothelial Cells
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Baptista, P. M., Siddiqui, M. M., Lozier, G., Rodriguez, S. R., Atala, A., & Soker, S. (2011). The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid. Hepatology, 53(2), 604-617. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24067

The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid. / Baptista, Pedro M.; Siddiqui, Mohummad M.; Lozier, Genevieve; Rodriguez, Sergio R.; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 53, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 604-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baptista, PM, Siddiqui, MM, Lozier, G, Rodriguez, SR, Atala, A & Soker, S 2011, 'The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid', Hepatology, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 604-617. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24067
Baptista PM, Siddiqui MM, Lozier G, Rodriguez SR, Atala A, Soker S. The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid. Hepatology. 2011 Feb 1;53(2):604-617. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24067
Baptista, Pedro M. ; Siddiqui, Mohummad M. ; Lozier, Genevieve ; Rodriguez, Sergio R. ; Atala, Anthony ; Soker, Shay. / The use of whole organ decellularization for the generation of a vascularized liver organoid. In: Hepatology. 2011 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 604-617.
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