The Use of Tablet Technology by Older Adults in Health Care Settings—Is It Effective and Satisfying? A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

Chethan Ramprasad, Leonardo Tamariz, Jenny Garcia-Barcena, Zsuzsanna Nemeth, Ana Palacio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This systematic review/meta-analysis examines the potential for older people to accept and use tablet technology in clinical settings by assessing satisfaction and effectiveness. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted of PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL through March 2017. Inclusion criteria included studies with any clinical use of a tablet technology with a median patient age above 65 years. Results: We included a total of 12 studies (4 randomized controlled trials, 4 cross-sectional studies, and 4 pre/post studies). Interventions included the use of tablet technology for medication self-management, post-surgery education, memory retention, cognitive rehabilitation, and exercise promotion. The use of tablet technology by older people in clinical settings was associated with high satisfaction with a pooled prevalence of satisfaction of 78%; 95% CI 27–100. We did not find evidence for effectiveness in improving clinical or behavioral outcomes. Conclusions: Older people can use and are satisfied with table technology in clinical settings. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of tablet technology at promoting health outcomes. Clinical Implications: Clinicians should be encouraged to utilize tablet technology in the care of older patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-26
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Gerontologist
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Tablets
Meta-Analysis
health care
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Exercise Therapy
Self Care
PubMed
cross-sectional study
surgery
rehabilitation
Patient Care
medication
promotion
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cross-Sectional Studies
inclusion
Education
Health
health

Keywords

  • Aging
  • meta-analysis
  • patient centered care
  • technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The Use of Tablet Technology by Older Adults in Health Care Settings—Is It Effective and Satisfying? A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis. / Ramprasad, Chethan; Tamariz, Leonardo; Garcia-Barcena, Jenny; Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Palacio, Ana.

In: Clinical Gerontologist, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 17-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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