The use of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify water sources in two hypersaline estuaries with different hydrologic regimes

Reń M. Price, Grzegorz Skrzypek, Pauline F. Grierson, Peter K Swart, James W. Fourqurean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen are used here with salinity data in geochemical and mass-balance models to decipher the proportion of different sources of water in two hypersaline estuaries that vary in size and hydrologic condition. Shark Bay, located on the mid-western coast of Australia, is hypersaline year round and has an arid climate. Florida Bay, located in the south-eastern United States, is seasonally hypersaline and has a subtropical climate. The water budget in both bays can be explained by evaporation of seawater, with seasonal inputs of surface-water runoff and precipitation. In Shark Bay, discharge from the Wooramel River associated with a recent major flood was detected in the relationship between the stable isotopic composition and salinity of surface waters near the mouth of the river, despite the persistence of hypersalinity. The volume of water equal to one pool volume replenished Hamelin Pool (a hypersaline water body located at the southern end of eastern Shark Bay that supports living stromatolites) once every 6-12 months. The eastern portion of Florida Bay received a greater proportion of freshwater from overland flow (70-80%) than did the western portion where rainfall was the dominant source of freshwater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)952-966
Number of pages15
JournalMarine and Freshwater Research
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

sharks
hydrogen
stable isotopes
stable isotope
estuaries
estuary
oxygen
surface water
shark
salinity
rivers
water
overland flow
Southeastern United States
subtropics
water balance
arid zones
body water
evaporation
mouth

Keywords

  • groundwater
  • precipitation
  • Shark Bay
  • surface water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

The use of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify water sources in two hypersaline estuaries with different hydrologic regimes. / Price, Reń M.; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Grierson, Pauline F.; Swart, Peter K; Fourqurean, James W.

In: Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol. 63, No. 11, 2012, p. 952-966.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Price, Reń M. ; Skrzypek, Grzegorz ; Grierson, Pauline F. ; Swart, Peter K ; Fourqurean, James W. / The use of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify water sources in two hypersaline estuaries with different hydrologic regimes. In: Marine and Freshwater Research. 2012 ; Vol. 63, No. 11. pp. 952-966.
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