The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in bony reconstruction of the irradiated and tissue-deficient patient

Robert Marx, John R. Ames

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighteen bony reconstructions of the mandible or maxilla using a newly defined and specific hyperbaric oxygen protocol are reported. Eleven of 12 grafts in irradiated tissue met six rigid criteria for a 91.6% rate of success. All six grafts into scarred and deficient tissue beds also met the same criteria, for an overall success rate of 94%. The rationale for emphasizing preoperative tissue preparation using hyperbaric oxygen is discussed, as are the mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen on a biochemical, cellular, and tissue level. Neovascularity and neocellularity are demonstrated histologically by human biopsy specimens, and this is suggested as being the reason for the excellent results of reconstruction in irradiated and/or deficient tissue beds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)412-420
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Oxygen
Transplants
Maxilla
Mandible
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in bony reconstruction of the irradiated and tissue-deficient patient. / Marx, Robert; Ames, John R.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.01.1982, p. 412-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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