The use of daclizumab, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in African-American and Hispanic first renal transplant recipients

Gaetano Ciancio, George W Burke, Kiliana Suzart, Adela D Mattiazzi, Anil Vaidya, David Roth, Warren Kupin, Anne Rosen, Nancy Johnson, Joshua Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited data are available on the use of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in conjunction with anti-IL-2 receptor antibody, in groups of kidney transplant recipients considered to be at higher risk. This study compared the incidence of acute rejection between African-American (AA), Hispanic (H), and non-African-American, non-Hispanics (non-AA, non-H) first renal transplant recipients. We studied 233 sequential first renal transplants. Of the 233, 37 recipients (16%) were AA, 85 (36.5%) were H and 111 (47.5%) were non-AA, non-H. All received daclizumab induction therapy (1 mg/kg) on the day of surgery, and every other week for a total of 5 doses, as well as mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids. At 1 year, patient and graft survival were 97% and 95% in AA, 98% and 98% in H, and 96% and 95% in non-AA, non-H, respectively (not statistically different). Biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes were 8.1% in AA, 4.7% in H, and 4.5% in non-AA, non-H (also not statistically different). This immunosuppressive protocol appears to be safe and effective in helping to minimize biopsy-proven acute rejection and optimize renal allograft survival in African-American and Hispanic renal transplant recipients in the first year post transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1010-1016
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003

Fingerprint

Mycophenolic Acid
Tacrolimus
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Kidney
Biopsy
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Graft Survival
Immunosuppressive Agents
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Allografts
Cohort Studies
Transplantation
Steroids
daclizumab
Transplant Recipients
Transplants
Antibodies

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Hispanics
  • Induction therapy
  • Kidney transplants
  • Mycophenolate mofetil
  • Racial minorities
  • Tacrolimus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

The use of daclizumab, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in African-American and Hispanic first renal transplant recipients. / Ciancio, Gaetano; Burke, George W; Suzart, Kiliana; Mattiazzi, Adela D; Vaidya, Anil; Roth, David; Kupin, Warren; Rosen, Anne; Johnson, Nancy; Miller, Joshua.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 3, No. 8, 01.08.2003, p. 1010-1016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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