The use of cyclosporine for recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant

A randomized pilot study

Roberto J. Firpi, Consuelo Soldevila-Pico, Giuseppe G. Morelli, Roniel Cabrera, Cynthia Levy, Virginia C. Clark, Amitabh Suman, Anthony Michaels, Chaoru Chen, David R. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cyclosporine has antiviral activity in vitro against hepatitis C (HCV). We performed a pilot study to prospectively determine the antiviral effect of cyclosporine during therapy with PEGalfa-2a and ribavirin in liver transplant recipients with recurrent HCV infection. Methods: Patients with HCV recurrence (Ishak Fibrosis Stage ≥ 2) were enrolled for 2 years at the University of Florida. Thirty-eight patients were randomized to continued tacrolimus or switched to cyclosporine. Both groups received PEGalfa-2a and ribavirin. Results: Twenty patients received tacrolimus and 18 cyclosporine, with a mean age of 53. Eighty-two percent were men, 84% Caucasian, and 90% genotype 1. In patients switched from tacrolimus to cyclosporine, HCV-RNA levels decreased by a mean of 0.39 million IU/ml during the 1 month prior to initiating PEG/RBV. Sustained viral response for cyclosporine was higher than in patients on tacrolimus receiving PEG/RBV therapy. Conclusions: This randomized controlled pilot study is the first in vivo study evaluating cyclosporine versus tacrolimus in liver transplant recipients undergoing antiviral therapy. Change from tacrolimus to cyclosporine led to a modest HCV RNA drop and appeared to enhance the antiviral response of PEG/RBV. A larger randomized study is necessary to see if cyclosporine offers any advantage over tacrolimus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-203
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Cyclosporine
Tacrolimus
Transplants
Liver
Antiviral Agents
Ribavirin
RNA
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Genotype
Recurrence
Infection

Keywords

  • Hepatitis C
  • Immunosuppression
  • Liver transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Firpi, R. J., Soldevila-Pico, C., Morelli, G. G., Cabrera, R., Levy, C., Clark, V. C., ... Nelson, D. R. (2010). The use of cyclosporine for recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant: A randomized pilot study. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 55(1), 196-203. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-009-0981-3

The use of cyclosporine for recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant : A randomized pilot study. / Firpi, Roberto J.; Soldevila-Pico, Consuelo; Morelli, Giuseppe G.; Cabrera, Roniel; Levy, Cynthia; Clark, Virginia C.; Suman, Amitabh; Michaels, Anthony; Chen, Chaoru; Nelson, David R.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 196-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Firpi, RJ, Soldevila-Pico, C, Morelli, GG, Cabrera, R, Levy, C, Clark, VC, Suman, A, Michaels, A, Chen, C & Nelson, DR 2010, 'The use of cyclosporine for recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant: A randomized pilot study', Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 196-203. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-009-0981-3
Firpi, Roberto J. ; Soldevila-Pico, Consuelo ; Morelli, Giuseppe G. ; Cabrera, Roniel ; Levy, Cynthia ; Clark, Virginia C. ; Suman, Amitabh ; Michaels, Anthony ; Chen, Chaoru ; Nelson, David R. / The use of cyclosporine for recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant : A randomized pilot study. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 2010 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 196-203.
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