The Unique Challenges Facing HIV-Positive Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes: HIV Viremia, Art Adherence, Engagement in HIV care, and Concurrent Substance Use

Conall O’Cleirigh, Sarah E. Valentine, Megan Pinkston, Debra Herman, C. Andres Bedoya, Janna R. Gordon, Steven Safren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that smoking may have negative associations with HIV health outcomes. The smoking rate in our sample of people living with HIV (N = 333) was triple that of the general population (57 v. 19 %). Regression analyses revealed that (smokers v. non-smokers) reported lower medication adherence (unstandardized beta = 9.01) and were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 2.85, 95 % CI [1.53–5.30]). Smokers attended fewer routine medical visits (β = −0.16) and were more likely to report recent hospitalization (OR = 1.89, 95 % CI [0.99, 3.57]). Smokers ranked “health” as less important to their quality of life (β = −0.13) and were more likely to report problematic alcohol (OR = 2.40, 95 % CI [1.35, 4.30]), cocaine (OR = 2.87, 95 % CI [1.48–5.58]), heroin (OR = 4.75, 95 % CI [1.01, 22.30]), or marijuana use (OR = 3.08, 95 % CI [1.76–5.38]). Findings underscore the need for integrated behavioral smoking cessation interventions and routine tobacco screenings in HIV primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-185
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viremia
Art
Smoke
Tobacco Products
HIV
Smoking
Medication Adherence
Heroin
Health
Smoking Cessation
Cannabis
Viral Load
Cocaine
Tobacco
Primary Health Care
Hospitalization
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Quality of Life
Population

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Engagement in care
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Smoking
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

The Unique Challenges Facing HIV-Positive Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes : HIV Viremia, Art Adherence, Engagement in HIV care, and Concurrent Substance Use. / O’Cleirigh, Conall; Valentine, Sarah E.; Pinkston, Megan; Herman, Debra; Bedoya, C. Andres; Gordon, Janna R.; Safren, Steven.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2014, p. 178-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O’Cleirigh, Conall ; Valentine, Sarah E. ; Pinkston, Megan ; Herman, Debra ; Bedoya, C. Andres ; Gordon, Janna R. ; Safren, Steven. / The Unique Challenges Facing HIV-Positive Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes : HIV Viremia, Art Adherence, Engagement in HIV care, and Concurrent Substance Use. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 178-185.
@article{e7bc2533fd5b4b1296ff7b8ed21c8151,
title = "The Unique Challenges Facing HIV-Positive Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes: HIV Viremia, Art Adherence, Engagement in HIV care, and Concurrent Substance Use",
abstract = "Evidence suggests that smoking may have negative associations with HIV health outcomes. The smoking rate in our sample of people living with HIV (N = 333) was triple that of the general population (57 v. 19 {\%}). Regression analyses revealed that (smokers v. non-smokers) reported lower medication adherence (unstandardized beta = 9.01) and were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 2.85, 95 {\%} CI [1.53–5.30]). Smokers attended fewer routine medical visits (β = −0.16) and were more likely to report recent hospitalization (OR = 1.89, 95 {\%} CI [0.99, 3.57]). Smokers ranked “health” as less important to their quality of life (β = −0.13) and were more likely to report problematic alcohol (OR = 2.40, 95 {\%} CI [1.35, 4.30]), cocaine (OR = 2.87, 95 {\%} CI [1.48–5.58]), heroin (OR = 4.75, 95 {\%} CI [1.01, 22.30]), or marijuana use (OR = 3.08, 95 {\%} CI [1.76–5.38]). Findings underscore the need for integrated behavioral smoking cessation interventions and routine tobacco screenings in HIV primary care.",
keywords = "Adherence, Engagement in care, HIV/AIDS, Smoking, Substance use",
author = "Conall O’Cleirigh and Valentine, {Sarah E.} and Megan Pinkston and Debra Herman and Bedoya, {C. Andres} and Gordon, {Janna R.} and Steven Safren",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s10461-014-0762-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "178--185",
journal = "AIDS and Behavior",
issn = "1090-7165",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Unique Challenges Facing HIV-Positive Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes

T2 - HIV Viremia, Art Adherence, Engagement in HIV care, and Concurrent Substance Use

AU - O’Cleirigh, Conall

AU - Valentine, Sarah E.

AU - Pinkston, Megan

AU - Herman, Debra

AU - Bedoya, C. Andres

AU - Gordon, Janna R.

AU - Safren, Steven

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Evidence suggests that smoking may have negative associations with HIV health outcomes. The smoking rate in our sample of people living with HIV (N = 333) was triple that of the general population (57 v. 19 %). Regression analyses revealed that (smokers v. non-smokers) reported lower medication adherence (unstandardized beta = 9.01) and were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 2.85, 95 % CI [1.53–5.30]). Smokers attended fewer routine medical visits (β = −0.16) and were more likely to report recent hospitalization (OR = 1.89, 95 % CI [0.99, 3.57]). Smokers ranked “health” as less important to their quality of life (β = −0.13) and were more likely to report problematic alcohol (OR = 2.40, 95 % CI [1.35, 4.30]), cocaine (OR = 2.87, 95 % CI [1.48–5.58]), heroin (OR = 4.75, 95 % CI [1.01, 22.30]), or marijuana use (OR = 3.08, 95 % CI [1.76–5.38]). Findings underscore the need for integrated behavioral smoking cessation interventions and routine tobacco screenings in HIV primary care.

AB - Evidence suggests that smoking may have negative associations with HIV health outcomes. The smoking rate in our sample of people living with HIV (N = 333) was triple that of the general population (57 v. 19 %). Regression analyses revealed that (smokers v. non-smokers) reported lower medication adherence (unstandardized beta = 9.01) and were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 2.85, 95 % CI [1.53–5.30]). Smokers attended fewer routine medical visits (β = −0.16) and were more likely to report recent hospitalization (OR = 1.89, 95 % CI [0.99, 3.57]). Smokers ranked “health” as less important to their quality of life (β = −0.13) and were more likely to report problematic alcohol (OR = 2.40, 95 % CI [1.35, 4.30]), cocaine (OR = 2.87, 95 % CI [1.48–5.58]), heroin (OR = 4.75, 95 % CI [1.01, 22.30]), or marijuana use (OR = 3.08, 95 % CI [1.76–5.38]). Findings underscore the need for integrated behavioral smoking cessation interventions and routine tobacco screenings in HIV primary care.

KW - Adherence

KW - Engagement in care

KW - HIV/AIDS

KW - Smoking

KW - Substance use

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928882078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928882078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10461-014-0762-7

DO - 10.1007/s10461-014-0762-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 24770984

AN - SCOPUS:84928882078

VL - 19

SP - 178

EP - 185

JO - AIDS and Behavior

JF - AIDS and Behavior

SN - 1090-7165

IS - 1

ER -