The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) Experiment: Introduction

Elliot L Atlas, Brian A. Ridley, Christopher A. Cantrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment was conducted during February-March, 2000 to study the evolution of tropospheric chemistry at mid to high latitudes over North America. The experiment used airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements of trace gases, radiation, and aerosols, combined with model simulations, to describe the major processes that control evolution of ozone and oxidants during the winter-spring transition. This paper introduces the major scientific questions of the TOPSE experiment, describes the conduct of the mission, and introduces the scientific results discussed in a series of companion papers in this special section. Among the significant findings of the experiment was that tropospheric ozone increases from winter to spring were dominated by in situ photochemical production in the troposphere, rather than by transport from the stratosphere. Also unique observations of widespread surface ozone depletion events, and of seasonal evolution of trace gases and aerosols as a function of latitude and altitude, were obtained over the course of the mission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans
Volume108
Issue number4
StatePublished - Feb 27 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ozone
ozone
trace gas
winter
aerosols
Aerosols
experiment
Experiments
aerosol
ozone depletion
Gases
stratosphere
troposphere
gases
Upper atmosphere
Troposphere
oxidant
polar regions
remote sensing
Oxidants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) Experiment : Introduction. / Atlas, Elliot L; Ridley, Brian A.; Cantrell, Christopher A.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, Vol. 108, No. 4, 27.02.2003, p. 1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4626b686b3b34caca5f9c0afd749fda3,
title = "The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) Experiment: Introduction",
abstract = "The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment was conducted during February-March, 2000 to study the evolution of tropospheric chemistry at mid to high latitudes over North America. The experiment used airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements of trace gases, radiation, and aerosols, combined with model simulations, to describe the major processes that control evolution of ozone and oxidants during the winter-spring transition. This paper introduces the major scientific questions of the TOPSE experiment, describes the conduct of the mission, and introduces the scientific results discussed in a series of companion papers in this special section. Among the significant findings of the experiment was that tropospheric ozone increases from winter to spring were dominated by in situ photochemical production in the troposphere, rather than by transport from the stratosphere. Also unique observations of widespread surface ozone depletion events, and of seasonal evolution of trace gases and aerosols as a function of latitude and altitude, were obtained over the course of the mission.",
author = "Atlas, {Elliot L} and Ridley, {Brian A.} and Cantrell, {Christopher A.}",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
day = "27",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "108",
pages = "1",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans",
issn = "2169-9275",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) Experiment

T2 - Introduction

AU - Atlas, Elliot L

AU - Ridley, Brian A.

AU - Cantrell, Christopher A.

PY - 2003/2/27

Y1 - 2003/2/27

N2 - The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment was conducted during February-March, 2000 to study the evolution of tropospheric chemistry at mid to high latitudes over North America. The experiment used airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements of trace gases, radiation, and aerosols, combined with model simulations, to describe the major processes that control evolution of ozone and oxidants during the winter-spring transition. This paper introduces the major scientific questions of the TOPSE experiment, describes the conduct of the mission, and introduces the scientific results discussed in a series of companion papers in this special section. Among the significant findings of the experiment was that tropospheric ozone increases from winter to spring were dominated by in situ photochemical production in the troposphere, rather than by transport from the stratosphere. Also unique observations of widespread surface ozone depletion events, and of seasonal evolution of trace gases and aerosols as a function of latitude and altitude, were obtained over the course of the mission.

AB - The Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment was conducted during February-March, 2000 to study the evolution of tropospheric chemistry at mid to high latitudes over North America. The experiment used airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements of trace gases, radiation, and aerosols, combined with model simulations, to describe the major processes that control evolution of ozone and oxidants during the winter-spring transition. This paper introduces the major scientific questions of the TOPSE experiment, describes the conduct of the mission, and introduces the scientific results discussed in a series of companion papers in this special section. Among the significant findings of the experiment was that tropospheric ozone increases from winter to spring were dominated by in situ photochemical production in the troposphere, rather than by transport from the stratosphere. Also unique observations of widespread surface ozone depletion events, and of seasonal evolution of trace gases and aerosols as a function of latitude and altitude, were obtained over the course of the mission.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642480986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1642480986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:1642480986

VL - 108

SP - 1

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

SN - 2169-9275

IS - 4

ER -