The three “E” approach to gender mainstreaming in climate change: Enumeration, education, empowerment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

There are substantial variations in the spatial patterns of gender gap and inequities in the Global South, with the highest gender gaps concentrated in South Asia and Central Africa. There is substantial overlap between the regions of higher gender gaps and higher vulnerability to climate change. Higher gender inequality in the Global South, as well as restrictions imposed by cultural and religious practices, leads to women often having less access to early warning messages or other resources to alert them of any impending disasters. The lack of empowerment and awareness restricts their opportunity to maintain a steady income from their main economic activities as a result of the adverse impacts of climate-driven natural disasters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSpringer Climate
PublisherSpringer
Pages139-148
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameSpringer Climate
ISSN (Print)2352-0698
ISSN (Electronic)2352-0701

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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