The summer Asia–North America teleconnection and its modulation by ENSO in Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5)

Kelsey Malloy, Ben P. Kirtman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Seasonal forecasts of summer continental United States (CONUS) rainfall have relatively low skill, partly due to a lack of consensus about its sources of predictability. The East Asian monsoon (EAM) can excite a cross-Pacific Rossby wave train, also known as the Asia–North America (ANA) teleconnection. In this study, we analyze the ANA teleconnection in observations and model simulations from the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5 (CAM5), comparing experiments with prescribed climatological SSTs and prescribed observed SSTs. Observations indicate a statistically significant relationship between a strong EAM and increased probability of positive precipitation anomalies over the US west coast and the Plains-Midwest. The ANA teleconnection and CONUS rainfall patterns are improved in the CAM5 experiment with prescribed observed SSTs, suggesting that SST variability is necessary to simulate this teleconnection over CONUS. We find distinct ANA patterns between ENSO phases, with the La Niña-related patterns in CAM5 disagreeing with observations. Using linear steady-state quasi-geostrophic theory, we conclude that incorrect EAM forcing location greatly contributed to CAM5 biases, and jet stream disparities explained the ENSO-related biases. Finally, we compared EAM forcing experiments with different mean states using a simple dry nonlinear atmospheric general circulation model. Overall, the ANA pattern over CONUS and its modulation by ENSO forcing are well described by dry dynamics on seasonal-to-interannual timescales, including the constructive (destructive) interference between El Niño (La Niña) modulation and the ANA patterns over CONUS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClimate Dynamics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

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