The standard metabolic rate of dolphin fish

Daniel D Benetti, R. W. Brill, S. A. Kraul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The standard metabolic rates (SMRs) of 11 (1.395–4.125 kg) dolphin fish (mahimahi or dorado, Coryphaena hippurus) were measured at 25°± 0.5°C. Fish were prevented from swimming with neuromuscular blocking agents and force ventilated. Heart rates were determined simultaneously. SMRs (358–726 mg O2 h –1) were several times those of other similarly sized active teleosts such as salmonids, but close to those of tunas. Heart rates (84–161 beats min –1) were also high, but alike those of tunas under similar circumstances. As in tunas, the high SMR of dolphin fish may result from high osmoregulatory costs engendered by their large gill surface areas and/or other adaptations necessary for achieving exceptionally high maximum metabolic rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-996
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Fish Biology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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tuna
dolphin
dolphins
Coryphaena hippurus
heart rate
fish
Salmonidae
surface area
gills
teleost
rate
cost

Keywords

  • dorado
  • energetics
  • growth
  • mahimahi
  • pelagic fish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

The standard metabolic rate of dolphin fish. / Benetti, Daniel D; Brill, R. W.; Kraul, S. A.

In: Journal of Fish Biology, Vol. 46, No. 6, 1995, p. 987-996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benetti, Daniel D ; Brill, R. W. ; Kraul, S. A. / The standard metabolic rate of dolphin fish. In: Journal of Fish Biology. 1995 ; Vol. 46, No. 6. pp. 987-996.
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