The significance of tumor contamination in the bone marrow from high-risk primary breast cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic support

J. J. Vredenburgh, O. Silva, G. Broadwater, D. Berry, K. DeSombre, C. Tyer, W. P. Petros, W. P. Peters, R. C. Bast

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the incidence and significance of tumor cell contamination of the bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells of patients who had high risk primary breast cancer involving 10 or more axillary lymph nodes and who received high dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and carmustine with hematopoietic support as consolidation following standard dose adjuvant chemotherapy. The autologous hematopoietic cell products were evaluated in 85 eligible patients. Eighty-three samples were available from the time of bone marrow harvest, and peripheral blood progenitor cells were evaluated from 57 of the 65 patients who additionally received these products. The screening technique utilized a panel of four anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibodies and an immunohistochemical technique. Thirty (36%) of the 83 evaluable patients had tumor cell contamination of the bone marrow. Only 2 (4%) of the 57 patients had tumor cell contamination of the peripheral blood progenitor cells. Tumor cell contamination of the bone marrow was associated with shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. In addition, the higher the number of tumor cells identified, the shorter disease-free and overall survival. There was no relationship between the tumor cell contamination of the bone marrow and the site of relapse. The combination of the log of the number of tumor cells +1 and number of positive lymph nodes predicted both disease-free and overall survival. Tumor cell contamination of the bone marrow from the harvest is associated with shorter disease-free and overall survival for patients who were treated with standard dose chemotherapy followed by consolidation with high dose alkylating agents and hematopoietic support. It is unclear what role the contaminating tumor cells have in relapse, and they may just be a high-risk marker. A comparison with other prognostic factors and characteristics of the tumor may determine the significance of the tumor contamination of the bone marrow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-97
Number of pages7
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume3
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1997

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Marrow
  • Micrometastases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The significance of tumor contamination in the bone marrow from high-risk primary breast cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Vredenburgh, J. J., Silva, O., Broadwater, G., Berry, D., DeSombre, K., Tyer, C., Petros, W. P., Peters, W. P., & Bast, R. C. (1997). The significance of tumor contamination in the bone marrow from high-risk primary breast cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic support. Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 3(2), 91-97.