The selective basis for dispersal of the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster.

M. L. Johnson, Michael Gaines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dispersal into optimal habitat resulted in high survival and reproduction. Frustrated dispersal resulted in low survival, but once these animals became established, they showed high reproductive activity. Females appeared to benefit most from living in a population when density was reduced by dispersal.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)684-693
Number of pages10
JournalEcology
Volume68
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Microtus ochrogaster
prairie
population density
habitats
animals
animal
habitat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

The selective basis for dispersal of the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster. / Johnson, M. L.; Gaines, Michael.

In: Ecology, Vol. 68, No. 3, 01.12.1987, p. 684-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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