The role of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity in signing an organ donor card

Michael T. Stephenson, Susan E. Morgan, Samaria D. Roberts-Perez, Tyler Harrison, Walid Afifi, Shawn D. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the influence of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity (the extent to which people think the body should remain unaltered after death) on intent to donate organs postmortem. A total of 4,426 participants from 6 universities completed surveys for this study. The results indicate that religiosity and religious norms had a nonsignificant effect on willingness to donate. In addition, attitudes toward donation had a weak positive relationship on intent to donate, whereas subjective norms exerted a modest positive relationship on intent to donate. Finally, the results reveal a strong direct and indirect effect of bodily integrity on intent to donate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-447
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Communication
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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