The role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference

Yossef Itzhak, Julio L. Martin, M. Dean Black, Paul L. Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies suggested the involvement of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the development of sensitization to psychostimulants. In the present study we investigated the role of nNOS in the rewarding properties of cocaine. Swiss Webster mice treated with cocaine (20 mg/kg) and saline every other day for 8 days (four drug and four saline sessions) developed conditioned place preference (CPP) for the drug-paired compartment of the cage. Pretreatment with the nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 25mg/kg), completely blocked cocaine-induced CPP. Mice deficient for the nNOS gene (homozygote nNOS(-/-) mice) were resistant to cocaine-induced CPP, while wild-type nNOS(+/+) mice developed a marked CPP following cocaine administration. Both, the pharmacological and genetic manipulations of nNOS suggest that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the rewarding properties of cocaine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2485-2488
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroreport
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 1998

Keywords

  • 7- Nitroindazole
  • Cocaine
  • Conditioned place preference
  • Knockout mice
  • Nitric oxide
  • Reward

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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