The Role of Guilt, Shame, and Social Distance in Bystander-Focused Prevention of Campus Sexual Violence

Shiyun Tian, Jo Yun Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Guided by the appraisal-tendency framework and construal level theory, this study investigates how emotional appeals (guilt vs. shame) and social distance frames (distant vs. proximal) influence college students’ attitude toward bystander action campaign and intention to intervene in sexual violence situations. The findings indicated a two-way interaction effect between these two message factors on campaign attitude and behavior intention. Additionally, self-efficacy was found to be the mediator that underlying the proposed match-based effects. The findings provide theoretical implications into persuasive communication in the context of campus sexual violence bystander intervention and offer practical insights to advertisers and social/health marketers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-155
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

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