The Role of Bicultural Stress and Perceived Context of Reception in the Expression of Aggression and Rule Breaking Behaviors Among Recent-Immigrant Hispanic Youth

Myriam Forster, Timothy Grigsby, Daniel W. Soto, Seth J Schwartz, Jennifer B. Unger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adolescent aggression and delinquency impede healthy adjustment in early adulthood and may have particularly serious long-term consequences for minority youth. Therefore, prevention research should examine these behaviors within a sociocultural framework among newer immigrant samples to determine whether, and how, adaptation to life in the US affects these behaviors. This study investigated the role of two sociocultural variables–bicultural stress and negative context of reception–on changes in aggression and rule breaking behaviors over two time points among recently immigrated Hispanic adolescents residing in Los Angeles (N = 136) and Miami-Dade (N = 142) counties. Linear stepwise regression models were used to assess the associations between predictors and behavioral outcomes. Bicultural stress and negative context of reception both had independent associations, above and beyond parental involvement and delinquent peer associations, with changes in aggressive and rule-breaking behavior during the first year of high school. These findings suggest that social, cultural, and interpersonal processes all influence deviant behaviors in recent-immigrant Hispanic populations. We discuss the implications of these finding for prevention and intervention research and practice. We also recommend that future research continue to examine the role of these factors over the course of adolescence and consider sociocultural influences when designing behavioral interventions for Hispanic immigrant populations

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1807-1827
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2015

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Aggression
Hispanic Americans
Social Adjustment
Los Angeles
Research
Population
Linear Models

Keywords

  • community violence
  • cultural contexts
  • youth violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

The Role of Bicultural Stress and Perceived Context of Reception in the Expression of Aggression and Rule Breaking Behaviors Among Recent-Immigrant Hispanic Youth. / Forster, Myriam; Grigsby, Timothy; Soto, Daniel W.; Schwartz, Seth J; Unger, Jennifer B.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 30, No. 11, 06.07.2015, p. 1807-1827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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