The Role of Behavioral and Neurocognitive Functioning in Substance Use Among Youth with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection and Perinatal HIV Exposure Without Infection

for the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined associations of self-regulatory behavior and cognitive functioning with substance use (SU) to inform interventions for youth with perinatal HIV infection (YPHIV) or exposure but uninfected (YPHEU). Youth aged 7–15 years (YPHIV, n = 390; YPHEU, n = 211) were followed longitudinally with cognitive testing and behavioral questionnaires including self-report of alcohol, marijuana, tobacco, and other SU. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to examine correlates of initiating each substance for those without prior use at baseline and generalized estimating equation analyses were used to address associations of cognitive/behavioral measurements with SU prevalence for the entire sample. Lower self-reported self-regulation skills, but higher cognitive functioning abilities, were associated with initiation and prevalent use of alcohol and marijuana regardless of HIV status. Our findings suggest SU screening tools and self-regulation interventions developed for general adolescent populations should be implemented for those with PHIV, who may be at heightened risk for SU-related health consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Cognition
  • Perinatal HIV
  • Self-regulation
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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