The Religious Commitment Inventory-10: Development, refinement, and validation of a brief scale for research and counseling

Everett L. Worthington, Nathaniel G. Wade, Terry L. Hight, Jennifer S. Ripley, Michael McCullough, Jack W. Berry, Michelle M. Schmitt, James T. Berry, Kevin H. Bursley, Lynn O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

439 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report the development of the Religious Commitment Inventory-10 (RCI-10), used in 6 studies. Sample sizes were 155, 132, and 150 college students; 240 Christian church-attending married adults; 468 undergraduates including (among others) Buddhists (n = 52), Muslims (n = 12), Hindus (n = 10), and nonreligious (n = 117); and 217 clients and 52 counselors in a secular or 1 of 6 religious counseling agencies. Scores on the RCI-10 had strong estimated internal consistency, 3-week and 5-month test-retest reliability, construct validity, and discriminant validity. Exploratory (Study 1) and confirmatory (Studies 4 and 6) factor analyses identified 2 highly correlated factors, suggesting a 1-factor structure as most parsimonious. Religious commitment predicted response to an imagined robbery (Study 2), marriage (Study 4), and counseling (Study 6).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-96
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Reproducibility of Results
Counseling
Equipment and Supplies
Islam
Marriage
Research
Sample Size
Statistical Factor Analysis
Students
Counselors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The Religious Commitment Inventory-10 : Development, refinement, and validation of a brief scale for research and counseling. / Worthington, Everett L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.; Hight, Terry L.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; McCullough, Michael; Berry, Jack W.; Schmitt, Michelle M.; Berry, James T.; Bursley, Kevin H.; O'Connor, Lynn.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 84-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Worthington, EL, Wade, NG, Hight, TL, Ripley, JS, McCullough, M, Berry, JW, Schmitt, MM, Berry, JT, Bursley, KH & O'Connor, L 2003, 'The Religious Commitment Inventory-10: Development, refinement, and validation of a brief scale for research and counseling', Journal of Counseling Psychology, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 84-96. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0167.50.1.84
Worthington, Everett L. ; Wade, Nathaniel G. ; Hight, Terry L. ; Ripley, Jennifer S. ; McCullough, Michael ; Berry, Jack W. ; Schmitt, Michelle M. ; Berry, James T. ; Bursley, Kevin H. ; O'Connor, Lynn. / The Religious Commitment Inventory-10 : Development, refinement, and validation of a brief scale for research and counseling. In: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 84-96.
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