The relationship of neighborhood climate to perceived social support and mental health in older hispanic immigrants in miami, florida

Scott Brown, Craig A. Mason, Arnold R. Spokane, Maria Cristina Cruza-Guet, Barbara Lopez, Jose Szapocznik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the relationship of neighborhood climate (i.e., neighborhood social environment) to perceived social support and mental health outcomes in older Hispanic immigrants. Method: A population-based sample of 273 community-dwelling older Hispanic immigrants (aged 70 to 100) in Miami, Florida, completed self-report measures of neighborhood climate, social support, and psychological distress and performance-based measures of cognitive functioning. Structural equation modeling was used to model the relationship of neighborhood climate to elders' perceived social support and mental health outcomes (i.e., cognitive functioning, psychological distress). Results: Neighborhood climate had a significant direct relationship to cognitive functioning, after controlling for demographics. By contrast, neighborhood climate had a significant indirect relationship to psychological distress, through its relationship to perceived social support. Moreover, social support mediated the relationship between neighborhood climate and psychological distress. Discussion: Findings suggest that a more positive neighborhood social environment may be associated with better mental health outcomes in urban, older Hispanic immigrants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-459
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

Climate
Hispanic Americans
Social Support
social support
Mental Health
mental health
immigrant
climate
Psychology
Social Environment
Independent Living
Self Report
Demography
Population
community
performance

Keywords

  • Cognitive functioning
  • Hispanics
  • Immigrants
  • Latinos
  • Mental health
  • Neighborhood climate
  • Older adults
  • Psychological distress
  • Social environment
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

The relationship of neighborhood climate to perceived social support and mental health in older hispanic immigrants in miami, florida. / Brown, Scott; Mason, Craig A.; Spokane, Arnold R.; Cruza-Guet, Maria Cristina; Lopez, Barbara; Szapocznik, Jose.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.06.2009, p. 431-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Scott ; Mason, Craig A. ; Spokane, Arnold R. ; Cruza-Guet, Maria Cristina ; Lopez, Barbara ; Szapocznik, Jose. / The relationship of neighborhood climate to perceived social support and mental health in older hispanic immigrants in miami, florida. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 431-459.
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