The relationship between restrictive and repetitive behaviors in individuals with autism and obsessive compulsive symptoms in parents

R. K. Abramson, S. A. Ravan, H. H. Wright, K. Wieduwilt, C. M. Wolpert, S. A. Donnelly, M. A. Pericak-Vance, M. L. Cuccaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between repetitive behaviors in individuals with autism and obsessive-compulsive behaviors in parents. We hypothesized that repetitive behaviors in probands with autism would be associated with increased obsessive-compulsive behaviors in parents in sporadic families (1 known case of autism per family and no known history of autism). Parents with clinically significant Y-BOCS scores were more likely to have a family history of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The empirically derived Autism Diagnostic Interview-R (ADI-R) factor, Insistence on Sameness, was positively correlated with obsessive-compulsive behaviors in parents. Further, when probands were grouped on the basis of parental Y-BOCS scores (clinically significant versus non-clinically significant), probands whose parents had clinically significant Y-BOCS scores had higher ADI-R Insistence on Sameness factor scores. The findings of the current study of sporadic families extend previous work that has shown an association between restrictive/repetitive behaviors in probands with autism and obsessive-compulsive features in parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-165
Number of pages11
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Insistence on sameness
  • Obsessive-compulsive features
  • Phenotype
  • Repetitive behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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