The Relationship Between Religious and Psychospiritual Measures and an Inflammation Marker (CRP) in Older Adults Experiencing Life Event Stress

Gail Ironson, Aurelie Lucette, Emily Hylton, Kenneth I. Pargament, Neal Krause

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Inflammation, often measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), is thought to be related to a number of debilitating illnesses as we age, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Stress has also been implicated in these processes. This study examines potential protective effects of spirituality and religion in older adults who have experienced stressful life events. As part of the nationwide Landmark Study of Spirituality and Health, a subsample of 643 middle-aged and older adults (age ≥ 50) who were at or above the median in number of life stressors (≥ 2) was included in this analysis. Psychospiritual and religious (PS/R) variables included: religious service attendance, prayer, religious meaning, religious hope, general meaning, general hope and sense of peace. Control variables included: age, gender, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, social support. Only church attendance predicted significantly lower CRP after controlling for covariates, even above the other PS/R variables (standardized β = − 0.14, t = − 3.23 p = 0.001). Those with frequent religious service attendance were 38% less likely to have clinically elevated CRP than those who attend rarely or never. Religious service attendance may confer protection in older adults experiencing stressful events as it was significantly associated with lower CRP, an inflammatory marker associated with illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 28 2018

Fingerprint

Psychological Stress
C-Reactive Protein
Hope
Inflammation
Spirituality
Religion
Social Support
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Alcohols
Education
Protein
Life Events
Health
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • CRP
  • Health
  • Inflammation
  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

The Relationship Between Religious and Psychospiritual Measures and an Inflammation Marker (CRP) in Older Adults Experiencing Life Event Stress. / Ironson, Gail; Lucette, Aurelie; Hylton, Emily; Pargament, Kenneth I.; Krause, Neal.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, 28.03.2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6fcc23466f704f399e1aa03e56e36836,
title = "The Relationship Between Religious and Psychospiritual Measures and an Inflammation Marker (CRP) in Older Adults Experiencing Life Event Stress",
abstract = "Inflammation, often measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), is thought to be related to a number of debilitating illnesses as we age, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Stress has also been implicated in these processes. This study examines potential protective effects of spirituality and religion in older adults who have experienced stressful life events. As part of the nationwide Landmark Study of Spirituality and Health, a subsample of 643 middle-aged and older adults (age ≥ 50) who were at or above the median in number of life stressors (≥ 2) was included in this analysis. Psychospiritual and religious (PS/R) variables included: religious service attendance, prayer, religious meaning, religious hope, general meaning, general hope and sense of peace. Control variables included: age, gender, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, social support. Only church attendance predicted significantly lower CRP after controlling for covariates, even above the other PS/R variables (standardized β = − 0.14, t = − 3.23 p = 0.001). Those with frequent religious service attendance were 38{\%} less likely to have clinically elevated CRP than those who attend rarely or never. Religious service attendance may confer protection in older adults experiencing stressful events as it was significantly associated with lower CRP, an inflammatory marker associated with illness.",
keywords = "CRP, Health, Inflammation, Religion, Spirituality, Stress",
author = "Gail Ironson and Aurelie Lucette and Emily Hylton and Pargament, {Kenneth I.} and Neal Krause",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1007/s10943-018-0600-8",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Journal of Religion and Health",
issn = "0022-4197",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic/Human Sciences Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Relationship Between Religious and Psychospiritual Measures and an Inflammation Marker (CRP) in Older Adults Experiencing Life Event Stress

AU - Ironson, Gail

AU - Lucette, Aurelie

AU - Hylton, Emily

AU - Pargament, Kenneth I.

AU - Krause, Neal

PY - 2018/3/28

Y1 - 2018/3/28

N2 - Inflammation, often measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), is thought to be related to a number of debilitating illnesses as we age, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Stress has also been implicated in these processes. This study examines potential protective effects of spirituality and religion in older adults who have experienced stressful life events. As part of the nationwide Landmark Study of Spirituality and Health, a subsample of 643 middle-aged and older adults (age ≥ 50) who were at or above the median in number of life stressors (≥ 2) was included in this analysis. Psychospiritual and religious (PS/R) variables included: religious service attendance, prayer, religious meaning, religious hope, general meaning, general hope and sense of peace. Control variables included: age, gender, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, social support. Only church attendance predicted significantly lower CRP after controlling for covariates, even above the other PS/R variables (standardized β = − 0.14, t = − 3.23 p = 0.001). Those with frequent religious service attendance were 38% less likely to have clinically elevated CRP than those who attend rarely or never. Religious service attendance may confer protection in older adults experiencing stressful events as it was significantly associated with lower CRP, an inflammatory marker associated with illness.

AB - Inflammation, often measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), is thought to be related to a number of debilitating illnesses as we age, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Stress has also been implicated in these processes. This study examines potential protective effects of spirituality and religion in older adults who have experienced stressful life events. As part of the nationwide Landmark Study of Spirituality and Health, a subsample of 643 middle-aged and older adults (age ≥ 50) who were at or above the median in number of life stressors (≥ 2) was included in this analysis. Psychospiritual and religious (PS/R) variables included: religious service attendance, prayer, religious meaning, religious hope, general meaning, general hope and sense of peace. Control variables included: age, gender, education, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, social support. Only church attendance predicted significantly lower CRP after controlling for covariates, even above the other PS/R variables (standardized β = − 0.14, t = − 3.23 p = 0.001). Those with frequent religious service attendance were 38% less likely to have clinically elevated CRP than those who attend rarely or never. Religious service attendance may confer protection in older adults experiencing stressful events as it was significantly associated with lower CRP, an inflammatory marker associated with illness.

KW - CRP

KW - Health

KW - Inflammation

KW - Religion

KW - Spirituality

KW - Stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044452861&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044452861&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10943-018-0600-8

DO - 10.1007/s10943-018-0600-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29594652

AN - SCOPUS:85044452861

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Journal of Religion and Health

JF - Journal of Religion and Health

SN - 0022-4197

ER -