The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis

Daniel J. Clauw, Maria Schmidt, David Radulovic, Andrea Singer, Paul Katz, John Bresette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a relatively uncommon and enigmatic disorder characterized by pain in the bladder and pelvic region, typically accompanied by urinary urgency and frequency. Fibromyalgia is a more common disorder, with the prominent symptoms being diffuse musculoskeletal pain and fatigue, and it has been well established that there is substantial clinical overlap between fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Although genitourinary and musculoskeletal symptoms predominate in IC and fibromyalgia respectively, both disorders share a number of features, including similar demographics, 'allied conditions' (e.g. irritable bowel syndrome, headaches, etc.), natural history, aggravating factors, and efficacious therapy. We hypothesized that there was substantial clinical overlap between fibromyalgia and IC, and examined cohorts of individuals with these two disorders in parallel, to compare the spectrum of symptomatology. Sixty fibromyalgia patients, 30 IC patients, and 30 age-matched healthy controls were questioned regarding current symptomatology. A dolorimeter examination was also performed in the three groups to assess peripheral nociception. We found that the frequency of current symptoms was very similar for the fibromyalgia and IC groups. Both the fibromyalgia and IC patients displayed increased pain sensitivity when compared to healthy individuals, at both tender and control points. These data suggest that IC and fibromyalgia have significant overlap in symptomatology, and that IC patients display diffusely increased peripheral nociception, as is seen in fibromyalgia. Although central mechanisms have been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia for some time, we speculate that these same types of mechanisms may be operative in IC, which has traditionally been felt to be a bladder disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Interstitial Cystitis
Fibromyalgia
Nociception
Urinary Bladder
Musculoskeletal Pain
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Somatoform Disorders
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Natural History
Pelvis
Fatigue
Headache
Demography
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Clauw, D. J., Schmidt, M., Radulovic, D., Singer, A., Katz, P., & Bresette, J. (1997). The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 31(1), 125-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3956(96)00051-9

The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis. / Clauw, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Maria; Radulovic, David; Singer, Andrea; Katz, Paul; Bresette, John.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 125-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clauw, DJ, Schmidt, M, Radulovic, D, Singer, A, Katz, P & Bresette, J 1997, 'The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis', Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 125-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3956(96)00051-9
Clauw DJ, Schmidt M, Radulovic D, Singer A, Katz P, Bresette J. The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis. Journal of Psychiatric Research. 1997 Jan 1;31(1):125-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3956(96)00051-9
Clauw, Daniel J. ; Schmidt, Maria ; Radulovic, David ; Singer, Andrea ; Katz, Paul ; Bresette, John. / The relationship between fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis. In: Journal of Psychiatric Research. 1997 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 125-131.
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