The relation between body fat distribution and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia: A cross-sectional pilot study

Martha M. Kato, M. Beatriz Currier, Oscar Villaverde, Mercedes Gonzalez-Blanco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity has recently become a concern for physicians treating schizophrenic patients. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we investigate which anthropometric measurement, body mass index or waist circumference, is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted from January 2001 to January 2002, examined body fat distribution and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors in 62 patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) recruited from an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that an increased waist circumference was associated with dyslipidemia (p < .01), hypertension (p < .05), and abnormal serum glucose (p < .05), whereas an increased body mass index was only associated with dyslipidemia (p < .05). In logistic regression analysis, after controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index, increased waist circumference remained significantly associated with dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.15, p < .05) and hypertension (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.17, p < .05). Conclusions: Waist circumference revealed a stronger correlation than body mass index to cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. We propose the measurement of waist circumference as a screening tool for cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Waist circumference measurement can provide an opportunity for primary prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-118
Number of pages4
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume7
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 20 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Fat Distribution
Waist Circumference
Schizophrenia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias
Body Mass Index
Hypertension
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Primary Prevention
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Coronary Disease
Psychiatry
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Physicians
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The relation between body fat distribution and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia : A cross-sectional pilot study. / Kato, Martha M.; Currier, M. Beatriz; Villaverde, Oscar; Gonzalez-Blanco, Mercedes.

In: Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 7, No. 3, 20.12.2005, p. 115-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2d82d3952fef47e1abc3eda986be11b4,
title = "The relation between body fat distribution and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia: A cross-sectional pilot study",
abstract = "Background: Obesity has recently become a concern for physicians treating schizophrenic patients. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we investigate which anthropometric measurement, body mass index or waist circumference, is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted from January 2001 to January 2002, examined body fat distribution and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors in 62 patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) recruited from an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that an increased waist circumference was associated with dyslipidemia (p < .01), hypertension (p < .05), and abnormal serum glucose (p < .05), whereas an increased body mass index was only associated with dyslipidemia (p < .05). In logistic regression analysis, after controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index, increased waist circumference remained significantly associated with dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 2.08, 95{\%} CI = 1.01 to 1.15, p < .05) and hypertension (odds ratio = 2.05, 95{\%} CI = 1.02 to 1.17, p < .05). Conclusions: Waist circumference revealed a stronger correlation than body mass index to cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. We propose the measurement of waist circumference as a screening tool for cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Waist circumference measurement can provide an opportunity for primary prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia.",
author = "Kato, {Martha M.} and Currier, {M. Beatriz} and Oscar Villaverde and Mercedes Gonzalez-Blanco",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "20",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "115--118",
journal = "The primary care companion for CNS disorders",
issn = "1523-5998",
publisher = "Physicians Postgraduate Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relation between body fat distribution and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia

T2 - A cross-sectional pilot study

AU - Kato, Martha M.

AU - Currier, M. Beatriz

AU - Villaverde, Oscar

AU - Gonzalez-Blanco, Mercedes

PY - 2005/12/20

Y1 - 2005/12/20

N2 - Background: Obesity has recently become a concern for physicians treating schizophrenic patients. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we investigate which anthropometric measurement, body mass index or waist circumference, is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted from January 2001 to January 2002, examined body fat distribution and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors in 62 patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) recruited from an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that an increased waist circumference was associated with dyslipidemia (p < .01), hypertension (p < .05), and abnormal serum glucose (p < .05), whereas an increased body mass index was only associated with dyslipidemia (p < .05). In logistic regression analysis, after controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index, increased waist circumference remained significantly associated with dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.15, p < .05) and hypertension (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.17, p < .05). Conclusions: Waist circumference revealed a stronger correlation than body mass index to cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. We propose the measurement of waist circumference as a screening tool for cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Waist circumference measurement can provide an opportunity for primary prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia.

AB - Background: Obesity has recently become a concern for physicians treating schizophrenic patients. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we investigate which anthropometric measurement, body mass index or waist circumference, is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted from January 2001 to January 2002, examined body fat distribution and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors in 62 patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) recruited from an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that an increased waist circumference was associated with dyslipidemia (p < .01), hypertension (p < .05), and abnormal serum glucose (p < .05), whereas an increased body mass index was only associated with dyslipidemia (p < .05). In logistic regression analysis, after controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index, increased waist circumference remained significantly associated with dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.15, p < .05) and hypertension (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.17, p < .05). Conclusions: Waist circumference revealed a stronger correlation than body mass index to cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia. We propose the measurement of waist circumference as a screening tool for cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Waist circumference measurement can provide an opportunity for primary prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28944439349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28944439349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16027766

AN - SCOPUS:28944439349

VL - 7

SP - 115

EP - 118

JO - The primary care companion for CNS disorders

JF - The primary care companion for CNS disorders

SN - 1523-5998

IS - 3

ER -