The perception of gastroenterology fellows towards the relationship between hand size and endoscopic training

Daniel L. Cohen, Jahnavi R. Naik, Leonardo J. Tamariz, Ryan D. Madanick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Some endoscopic trainees find it difficult to manipulate an endoscope's controls, possibly due to small hand size. To assess this, a survey was mailed to all gastroenterology fellows in the US. Two hundred twenty-seven of 1,295 (17.5%) fellows responded. Median surgical glove size was 7.5. Ninety-three respondents (41.0%) considered their hand too small for a standard endoscope's handle; 176 (78.2%) felt that hand size affects the ability to learn endoscopy. Seventy-seven (34.2%) would use smaller handled endoscopes if available. Of the 38 respondents with glove sizes ≤6.5, 37 (97.4%) were female. These respondents were more likely to consider their hand too small (P < 0.001), want to use smaller handled endoscopes (P < 0.001), and feel that training programs should offer them (P = 0.009). These results suggest that a significant number of trainees, especially women, perceive that their hands are too small for standard endoscopes and believe that hand size plays a role in learning and performing endoscopy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1902-1909
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume53
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Gastroenterology
  • Hand size
  • Medical ergonomics
  • Physician attitudes
  • Physician training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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