The Perception of Being a Burden in Acute and Chronic Pain Patients Is Associated with Affirmation of Different Types of Suicidality

David A Fishbain, Daniel Bruns, Alexander Bruns, Jinrun Gao, John E Lewis, Laura J. Meyer, John Mark Disorbio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The perception of being a burden or self-perceived burden (SPB) is associated with suicide ideation in chronic pain patients (CPPs). The objective of this study was to determine if SPB is associated with five types of suicidality (wish to die, active suicide ideation, presence of suicide plan, history of suicide attempts, and preference for death over being disabled) in CPPs and acute pain patients (APPs).

METHODS: Affirmation of SPB was statistically compared between community nonpatients without pain (CNPWP), APPs, and CPPs. APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality were compared statistically for affirmation of SPB. Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to determine the significance of SPB in predicting each of the five types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs controlling for age, gender, race, education status, and two types of measures of depression (current depression and vegetative depression).

RESULTS: APPs and CPPs were statistically more likely to affirm SPB than CNPWPs and CPPs were more likely than APPs to do so. There were no differences between APPs and CPPs in affirming SPB in APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality. In CPPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion utilizing both types of depression measures. For APPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion except for history of suicide attempt controlling for vegetative depression.

CONCLUSIONS: SPB is associated with the vast majority of different types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-538
Number of pages9
JournalPain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Acute Pain
Chronic Pain
Suicide
Depression

Keywords

  • Acute Pain Patients
  • Burden
  • Burden Perception
  • Chronic Pain Patients
  • Community Patients Without Pain
  • Self-Perceived Burden
  • Suicidality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The Perception of Being a Burden in Acute and Chronic Pain Patients Is Associated with Affirmation of Different Types of Suicidality. / Fishbain, David A; Bruns, Daniel; Bruns, Alexander; Gao, Jinrun; Lewis, John E; Meyer, Laura J.; Disorbio, John Mark.

In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 530-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fishbain, David A ; Bruns, Daniel ; Bruns, Alexander ; Gao, Jinrun ; Lewis, John E ; Meyer, Laura J. ; Disorbio, John Mark. / The Perception of Being a Burden in Acute and Chronic Pain Patients Is Associated with Affirmation of Different Types of Suicidality. In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.). 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 530-538.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The perception of being a burden or self-perceived burden (SPB) is associated with suicide ideation in chronic pain patients (CPPs). The objective of this study was to determine if SPB is associated with five types of suicidality (wish to die, active suicide ideation, presence of suicide plan, history of suicide attempts, and preference for death over being disabled) in CPPs and acute pain patients (APPs).METHODS: Affirmation of SPB was statistically compared between community nonpatients without pain (CNPWP), APPs, and CPPs. APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality were compared statistically for affirmation of SPB. Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to determine the significance of SPB in predicting each of the five types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs controlling for age, gender, race, education status, and two types of measures of depression (current depression and vegetative depression).RESULTS: APPs and CPPs were statistically more likely to affirm SPB than CNPWPs and CPPs were more likely than APPs to do so. There were no differences between APPs and CPPs in affirming SPB in APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality. In CPPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion utilizing both types of depression measures. For APPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion except for history of suicide attempt controlling for vegetative depression.CONCLUSIONS: SPB is associated with the vast majority of different types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs.",
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AU - Bruns, Daniel

AU - Bruns, Alexander

AU - Gao, Jinrun

AU - Lewis, John E

AU - Meyer, Laura J.

AU - Disorbio, John Mark

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: The perception of being a burden or self-perceived burden (SPB) is associated with suicide ideation in chronic pain patients (CPPs). The objective of this study was to determine if SPB is associated with five types of suicidality (wish to die, active suicide ideation, presence of suicide plan, history of suicide attempts, and preference for death over being disabled) in CPPs and acute pain patients (APPs).METHODS: Affirmation of SPB was statistically compared between community nonpatients without pain (CNPWP), APPs, and CPPs. APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality were compared statistically for affirmation of SPB. Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to determine the significance of SPB in predicting each of the five types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs controlling for age, gender, race, education status, and two types of measures of depression (current depression and vegetative depression).RESULTS: APPs and CPPs were statistically more likely to affirm SPB than CNPWPs and CPPs were more likely than APPs to do so. There were no differences between APPs and CPPs in affirming SPB in APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality. In CPPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion utilizing both types of depression measures. For APPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion except for history of suicide attempt controlling for vegetative depression.CONCLUSIONS: SPB is associated with the vast majority of different types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The perception of being a burden or self-perceived burden (SPB) is associated with suicide ideation in chronic pain patients (CPPs). The objective of this study was to determine if SPB is associated with five types of suicidality (wish to die, active suicide ideation, presence of suicide plan, history of suicide attempts, and preference for death over being disabled) in CPPs and acute pain patients (APPs).METHODS: Affirmation of SPB was statistically compared between community nonpatients without pain (CNPWP), APPs, and CPPs. APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality were compared statistically for affirmation of SPB. Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to determine the significance of SPB in predicting each of the five types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs controlling for age, gender, race, education status, and two types of measures of depression (current depression and vegetative depression).RESULTS: APPs and CPPs were statistically more likely to affirm SPB than CNPWPs and CPPs were more likely than APPs to do so. There were no differences between APPs and CPPs in affirming SPB in APPs and CPPs who had affirmed any of the five types of suicidality. In CPPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion utilizing both types of depression measures. For APPs, SPB predicted each type of suicidality in a significant fashion except for history of suicide attempt controlling for vegetative depression.CONCLUSIONS: SPB is associated with the vast majority of different types of suicidality in APPs and CPPs.

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KW - Burden Perception

KW - Chronic Pain Patients

KW - Community Patients Without Pain

KW - Self-Perceived Burden

KW - Suicidality

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