The people of the nook

Jewish use of the internet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Considered both an ethnic group and a religious group, there are about 13-14 million Jews worldwide (0.2 % of the population). The 6.7 million Jews in the U.S. constitute about 2 % of the American population. Internet usage by the American Jewish community is significant as an educational resource and a communication tool. As early as 2000, the National Jewish Population Survey found that 40 % of Jewish adults used the internet for Jewish-related information in 1999, a remarkable figure given that the internet only really entered the public domain in a significant way in the mid-1990s. Thus, the "People of the Book" have embraced technology to become the "People of the Nook." First, we examine those using the internet both for general information about Jewish-related items and their local Jewish communities. The extent to which various demographic and religious subgroups of American Jews use the internet is also explored. Second, internet uses are examined, including educational purposes, ritual obligations (z’manim, counting the Omer, eruvim, electronic Yahrtzeit boards), convening a minyan, and conducting research. From the proliferation of mobile applications and web-based communication tools to the ever-growing storehouse of information, modern technology has made a significant imprint upon Jewish religious practice. The internet continues to play an important and positive role in Jewish religious life, as both an educational medium and a tool for performing religious tasks. Judaism, like other faiths, puts significant emphasis on community and physical proximity. The use of the internet to form a community by overcoming geographic space at almost no cost is an exciting opportunity allowing people to participate who might otherwise be unable because of time and cost constraints or physical limitations. But does this community downplay the physical proximity that allows one to comfort a mourner by a hug or a pat on the back?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages3831-3856
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9789401793766, 9789401793759
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Internet
Jew
community
Judaism
communication
World Wide Web
religious group
ethnic group
information technology
costs
cost
proliferation
faith
religious behavior
obligation
electronics
resource
resources
Physical
Education

Keywords

  • Community formation
  • Jewish education
  • Jewish internet
  • Jewish religious practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Sheskin, I. M. (2015). The people of the nook: Jewish use of the internet. In The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics (pp. 3831-3856). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9376-6_202

The people of the nook : Jewish use of the internet. / Sheskin, Ira M.

The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics. Springer Netherlands, 2015. p. 3831-3856.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sheskin, IM 2015, The people of the nook: Jewish use of the internet. in The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics. Springer Netherlands, pp. 3831-3856. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9376-6_202
Sheskin IM. The people of the nook: Jewish use of the internet. In The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics. Springer Netherlands. 2015. p. 3831-3856 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9376-6_202
Sheskin, Ira M. / The people of the nook : Jewish use of the internet. The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics. Springer Netherlands, 2015. pp. 3831-3856
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