The north-south security divide in the 'New Europe'

Nuray V. Ibryamova, Roger E Kanet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The focus of this article is on the degree to which divisions similar to the global north-south divisions have existed and continue to exist within Europe and on their relevance for current and future political and economic developments on the continent. Particular attention is devoted to the prevailing security concerns in Europe and their role in creating the "North- South" divide on the continent. The imperial past of European nations in the southeast and east frequently played a determining role in their political, economic, and cultural development. Moreover, the degree of transnationalism and multilateralism found in Eastern Europe during the communist period was hardly comparable with the considerable and growing institutional thickness in Western Europe. It is in the south, specifically in Southeastern Europe, where the economic, political and security gaps are the greatest. Hence, there have emerged several "Europes," depending upon their political and economic development, prevalent security concerns, and institutional affiliations. It is our contention that the primary security concerns of the European "North" and "South" differ in their referent objects. The extension of the emerging European border regime to the new member states as a major component of the accession process enabled the EU essentially to thicken its borders by utilizing its neighbors as buffers. Specifically, this emphasis on restrictive border policies undermines the headline goal of European foreign policy, namely, continent-wide stability, ending regional conflicts, and furthering economic integration. It also has helped divide Europe in two, with the "other" Europe being either anxious to get in, or feeling excluded.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-28
Number of pages28
JournalTamkang Journal of International Affairs
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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economics
European foreign policy
multilateralism
cultural development
economic integration
Southeastern Europe
Western Europe
Eastern Europe
EU
regime
Economic development
Political development
Political economics
Economic integration
Multilateralism
Accessions
Transnationalism
Buffer
New member states
Foreign policy

Keywords

  • Demographic problems in Europe
  • EU eastern enlargement
  • European security
  • European union
  • Securitization
  • Terrorism and security

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

The north-south security divide in the 'New Europe'. / Ibryamova, Nuray V.; Kanet, Roger E.

In: Tamkang Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 10, No. 1, 07.2006, p. 1-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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