The New Latin Nation: Immigration and the Hispanic Population of the United States

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

As of 2000, the Hispanic population of the United States reached 35.3 million (excluding the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico), representing 12.5 percent of the total. Hispanics grew in numbers by 57.9 percent in the last intercensal period, as compared with 13.2 percent for the national population (US Bureau of the Census 2001). Without its Hispanic component, the growth of the national population would have fallen into the single digits and a number of cities and states would have actually lost population. These facts are well known, as is the source of this rapid growth: sustained immigration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationA Companion to Latina/o Studies
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages15-24
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781405177603
ISBN (Print)9781405126229
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 27 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Enforcement policies
  • Hispanic immigrants
  • National reach
  • New second generation
  • Transnational communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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