The neurobiology of aging and the neurobiology of depression: Is there a relationship?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between the biology of aging and the biology of affective disorders remains obscure, largely for two reasons. First, and most important, is the equivocal nature of the data that indicates that increasing age predisposes an individual to episodes of major depression. Second, is the lack of tools to assess neurotransmitter turnover and availability in humans. Indirect measures such as neuroendocrine function tests, platelet, plasma and CSF studies contain too many confounding factors, to allow for adequate testing of neurochemical hypotheses. Development of novel approaches based on dynamic brain imaging methods may ameliorate these shortcomings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-122
Number of pages3
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume9
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurobiology
Platelet Function Tests
Depression
Mood Disorders
Neuroimaging
Neurotransmitter Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The neurobiology of aging and the neurobiology of depression : Is there a relationship? / Nemeroff, Charles.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 9, No. C, 01.01.1988, p. 120-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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