The need for an aging and cancer curriculum for hematology/oncology trainees

Arash Naeim, Arti Hurria, Arati Rao, Harvey Cohen, Mitchell Heflin, Pearl H Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: There has long been recognition for the need of education and training in aging and cancer. As the proportion of older individuals in the United States increases, with 20% being over 65 by 2030, it will become increasingly important for hematology-oncology trainees to have directed curriculum in geriatric-oncology. Methods: In order to better define the best way to meet the need for educational material specific to the special population of older patients for Oncology Training Programs, a survey was developed and administered to Hematology-Oncology Program Directors, in order to perform an educational needs assessment. The survey was administered during the 2008 Annual Meeting to 54 attendees at the Program Director's Breakfast. The survey asked questions regarding general program characteristics, as well as the importance of geriatric-oncology curriculum, a description of such current curriculum, the most important topics to cover in the curriculum, and recommendations for the format of the curriculum. Results: The survey showed that 32% of training programs had a formal curriculum that covered topics in geriatric-oncology, 56% had an informal curriculum, and 2% had no curriculum. Most used a multimodality approach including clinical experience, journal clubs and lectures. Most hematology-oncology fellowship directors believe curriculum in geriatric-oncology is important; have faculty with either training or interest in geriatric-oncology that could facilitate curriculum delivery; and would use a curriculum if it were readily available. Conclusion: Investment in developing content and curriculum in geriatric-oncology would be very valuable and well-received.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-113
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Geriatric Oncology
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

Hematology
Curriculum
Geriatrics
Neoplasms
Education
Breakfast
Needs Assessment

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Education
  • Oncology fellowship
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Oncology

Cite this

The need for an aging and cancer curriculum for hematology/oncology trainees. / Naeim, Arash; Hurria, Arti; Rao, Arati; Cohen, Harvey; Heflin, Mitchell; Seo, Pearl H.

In: Journal of Geriatric Oncology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.10.2010, p. 109-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Naeim, Arash ; Hurria, Arti ; Rao, Arati ; Cohen, Harvey ; Heflin, Mitchell ; Seo, Pearl H. / The need for an aging and cancer curriculum for hematology/oncology trainees. In: Journal of Geriatric Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 109-113.
@article{248d3377c0064c3d8195ceb8c8087015,
title = "The need for an aging and cancer curriculum for hematology/oncology trainees",
abstract = "Purpose: There has long been recognition for the need of education and training in aging and cancer. As the proportion of older individuals in the United States increases, with 20{\%} being over 65 by 2030, it will become increasingly important for hematology-oncology trainees to have directed curriculum in geriatric-oncology. Methods: In order to better define the best way to meet the need for educational material specific to the special population of older patients for Oncology Training Programs, a survey was developed and administered to Hematology-Oncology Program Directors, in order to perform an educational needs assessment. The survey was administered during the 2008 Annual Meeting to 54 attendees at the Program Director's Breakfast. The survey asked questions regarding general program characteristics, as well as the importance of geriatric-oncology curriculum, a description of such current curriculum, the most important topics to cover in the curriculum, and recommendations for the format of the curriculum. Results: The survey showed that 32{\%} of training programs had a formal curriculum that covered topics in geriatric-oncology, 56{\%} had an informal curriculum, and 2{\%} had no curriculum. Most used a multimodality approach including clinical experience, journal clubs and lectures. Most hematology-oncology fellowship directors believe curriculum in geriatric-oncology is important; have faculty with either training or interest in geriatric-oncology that could facilitate curriculum delivery; and would use a curriculum if it were readily available. Conclusion: Investment in developing content and curriculum in geriatric-oncology would be very valuable and well-received.",
keywords = "Curriculum, Education, Oncology fellowship, Training",
author = "Arash Naeim and Arti Hurria and Arati Rao and Harvey Cohen and Mitchell Heflin and Seo, {Pearl H}",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jgo.2010.08.004",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "109--113",
journal = "Journal of Geriatric Oncology",
issn = "1879-4068",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The need for an aging and cancer curriculum for hematology/oncology trainees

AU - Naeim, Arash

AU - Hurria, Arti

AU - Rao, Arati

AU - Cohen, Harvey

AU - Heflin, Mitchell

AU - Seo, Pearl H

PY - 2010/10/1

Y1 - 2010/10/1

N2 - Purpose: There has long been recognition for the need of education and training in aging and cancer. As the proportion of older individuals in the United States increases, with 20% being over 65 by 2030, it will become increasingly important for hematology-oncology trainees to have directed curriculum in geriatric-oncology. Methods: In order to better define the best way to meet the need for educational material specific to the special population of older patients for Oncology Training Programs, a survey was developed and administered to Hematology-Oncology Program Directors, in order to perform an educational needs assessment. The survey was administered during the 2008 Annual Meeting to 54 attendees at the Program Director's Breakfast. The survey asked questions regarding general program characteristics, as well as the importance of geriatric-oncology curriculum, a description of such current curriculum, the most important topics to cover in the curriculum, and recommendations for the format of the curriculum. Results: The survey showed that 32% of training programs had a formal curriculum that covered topics in geriatric-oncology, 56% had an informal curriculum, and 2% had no curriculum. Most used a multimodality approach including clinical experience, journal clubs and lectures. Most hematology-oncology fellowship directors believe curriculum in geriatric-oncology is important; have faculty with either training or interest in geriatric-oncology that could facilitate curriculum delivery; and would use a curriculum if it were readily available. Conclusion: Investment in developing content and curriculum in geriatric-oncology would be very valuable and well-received.

AB - Purpose: There has long been recognition for the need of education and training in aging and cancer. As the proportion of older individuals in the United States increases, with 20% being over 65 by 2030, it will become increasingly important for hematology-oncology trainees to have directed curriculum in geriatric-oncology. Methods: In order to better define the best way to meet the need for educational material specific to the special population of older patients for Oncology Training Programs, a survey was developed and administered to Hematology-Oncology Program Directors, in order to perform an educational needs assessment. The survey was administered during the 2008 Annual Meeting to 54 attendees at the Program Director's Breakfast. The survey asked questions regarding general program characteristics, as well as the importance of geriatric-oncology curriculum, a description of such current curriculum, the most important topics to cover in the curriculum, and recommendations for the format of the curriculum. Results: The survey showed that 32% of training programs had a formal curriculum that covered topics in geriatric-oncology, 56% had an informal curriculum, and 2% had no curriculum. Most used a multimodality approach including clinical experience, journal clubs and lectures. Most hematology-oncology fellowship directors believe curriculum in geriatric-oncology is important; have faculty with either training or interest in geriatric-oncology that could facilitate curriculum delivery; and would use a curriculum if it were readily available. Conclusion: Investment in developing content and curriculum in geriatric-oncology would be very valuable and well-received.

KW - Curriculum

KW - Education

KW - Oncology fellowship

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957918482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957918482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jgo.2010.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jgo.2010.08.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77957918482

VL - 1

SP - 109

EP - 113

JO - Journal of Geriatric Oncology

JF - Journal of Geriatric Oncology

SN - 1879-4068

IS - 2

ER -